hole

  1. an opening into or through something
  2. an opening deliberately made in or through something
  3. one playing period (from tee to green) on a golf course
  4. an unoccupied space
  5. a fault
  6. informal terms for a difficult situation
  7. informal terms for the mouth

HolE

In E. coli and other bacteria, holE is a gene that encodes the theta subunit of DNA polymerase III. ==References == ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HolE

hole

(from the article `chess`) ...with knights, paid dividends in the middlegame if the centre was closed. (See Game 6.) He originated the term `hole` to mean a vulnerable square ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/61

hole

(from the article `Cosmos`) ...groups have carried out such a program, some in fairly restricted areas of the sky and others over larger regions but to shallower depths. A ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/61

Hole

(from the article `Love, Courtney`) In 1989 Love formed Hole with the guitarist Eric Erlandson (b. Jan. 9, 1963, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S.), the bassist Jill Emery (b. 1962), and the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/61

hole

[n] - a fault 2. [n] - an unoccupied space 3. [n] - a depression hollowed out of solid matter 4. [n] - an opening into or through something 5. [n] - one playing period (from tee to green) on a golf course 6. [n] - an opening deliberately made in or through something 7. [v] - in golf: hit the ball into the hole 8. [v]
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=hole

Hole

• (n.) A hollow place or cavity; an excavation; a pit; an opening in or through a solid body, a fabric, etc.; a perforation; a rent; a fissure. • (a.) Whole. • (n.) To drive into a hole, as an animal, or a billiard ball. • (n.) An excavation in the ground, made by an animal to live in, or a natural cavity inhabited by an animal;...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/hole/

hole

noun an opening deliberately made in or through something
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=hole

hole

(topology) A topological structure (see topology) that prevents any object in which it occurs from being continuously shrunk to a point. A sphere has no holes; a torus and a teacup each have one hole. Related entry • genus
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/H/hole_topology.html

Hole

[association football] In association football, or soccer, the hole is generally referred to as the gap between a team`s midfield players and its front strikers, particularly in a 4-4-2 formation resulting in a 4-4-1-1 formation. The gap might be filled through the employment of an attacking midfielder, or a deep lying striker. The player i...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hole_(association_football)

Hole

[Bottom] `Hole` is the first episode of the third series of British television sitcom, Bottom. It was first broadcast on 6 January 1995. It is the last of only three episodes (along with Culture and Contest) to feature only the two main characters, however it is the only one of the three to be set entirely outside of the flat. It is also a ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hole_(Bottom)

Hole

[quasiparticle] ===User:Oxyman42=== Oxyman42 was blocked over a dispute with me elsewhere, and never realy showed he understood why socking is not allowed (see unbock requests and the subsequent block of Oxyman). Obviously all users have similar names. The new account Oxyman24 has recently registered a contrary opinion contrary to mine on a...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hole_(quasiparticle)

Hole

Hole (hōl) adjective Whole. [ Obsolete] Chaucer.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/53

Hole

Hole intransitive verb To go or get into a hole. B. Jonson.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/53

Hole

Hole noun [ Middle English hol , hole , Anglo-Saxon hol , hole, cavern, from hol , adjective , hollow ; akin to Dutch hol , Old High German hol , German hohl , Danish huul hollow, hul hole, Swedish hål , Icelandic...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/53

Hole

Hole transitive verb [ Anglo-Saxon holian . See Hole , noun ] 1. To cut, dig, or bore a hole or holes in; as, to hole a post for the insertion of rails or bars. Chapman. 2. To drive into a hole, as an animal, or a billiard ball.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/53

Hole

1. 4
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Entertainment/Golf/

hole

1. A hollow place or cavity; an excavation; a pit; an opening in or through a solid body, a fabric, etc.; a perforation; a rent; a fissure. 'The holes where eyes should be.' (Shak) 'The blind walls Were full of chinks and holes.' (Tennyson) 'The priest took a chest, and bored a hole in the lid.' (2 Kings xii. 9) ... 2. An excavation in the ground, ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

hole

A 4 1/4" (108 mm) round receptacle in the green - at least 4" (100 mm) deep. Also refers to one of the nine or eighteen areas between the tee and the green.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21422

Hole

A circular hole in the ground which is also called "the cup", 4.25 inches in diameter.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_golf

Hole

A hole is a vulnerability in the design software and/or hardware that allows circumvention of security measures.
Found on http://home.mcafee.com/virusinfo/glossary?ctst=1#

hole

A positive charge carrier in a semiconductor which materially does not exist. A hole is the absence of an electron moving in the direction opposite to that of an electron and carrying a positive charge.
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/H/hole.html

Hole

Area from the tee to the fairway and green on a course.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21264

Hole

Hole is slang for the anus.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZH.HTM

hole

in solid-state physics, the name given to a missing electron in certain metals and semiconductors. A missing electron is the same as an added ... [14 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/61
No exact match found