flux

A chemically active agent that speeds the wetting process of metals with molten solder: a short-form way of describing a complex of rosin, activators and solvents. When heated, fluxes remove minor surface oxidation, minimise oxidation of the base metal, and promote the formation of an intermetallic layer between solder and base metal. Flux will no...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20870

Flux

A material applied to the surface of copper pipes and fittings to assist in the cleaning and bonding process.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

flux

A substance applied to metal prior to brazing or soldering which cleans the metal and creates a coating on the surface to protect it from re-oxidizing during the process.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22290

flux

Any liquid added to another liquid to improve flow, usually to prevent the formation of oxides.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22291

Flux

In the various subfields of physics, there exist two common usages of the term flux, each with rigorous mathematical frameworks. A simple and ubiquitous concept throughout physics and applied mathematics is the flow of a physical property in space, frequently also with time variation. It is the basis of the field concept in physics and mathematics...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux

flux

(fluks) an excessive flow or discharge. the rate of the flow of some quantity (or magnetic field) per unit area. magnetic flux(Φ) a quantitative measure of a magnetic field.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

flux

(from the article `enamelwork`) ...a compound of flint or sand, red lead, and soda or potash. These materials are melted together, producing an almost clear glass, with a slightly ... Common ways of applying sealing glass are as frits and as preforms. Glass is crushed or ball-milled in order to obtain a fine powder, or frit, which ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/40

flux

(from the article `nature, philosophy of`) On the other hand, the flux of a vector field V out of a closed surface can be formed by integration. If this flux is always zero (for every choice ... ...area S, and the arrow representing its direction is drawn normal to the loop. Then, if the electric field in the region of the elementary ar...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/40

flux

(from the article `nervous system`) By permitting a flux of Na+ into the cell, the opening of ion channels slightly depolarizes the membrane. The extent to which the membrane is ... ...disequilibrium. The sudden shift from a resting to an active state, when the neuron generates a nerve impulse, is caused by a sudden movement of ... [...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/40

flux

[n] - the rate of flow of energy or particles across a given surface 2. [n] - a substance added to molten metals to bond with impurities that can then be readily removed 3. [n] - excessive discharge of liquid from a cavity or organ (as in watery diarrhea) 4. [n] - a flow or discharge 5. [n] - in constant change
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=flux

Flux

• (n.) The act of flowing; a continuous moving on or passing by, as of a flowing stream; constant succession; change. • (n.) The matter thus discharged. • (n.) Flowing; unstable; inconstant; variable. • (n.) The quantity of a fluid that crosses a unit area of a given surface in a unit of time. • (v. t.) To cause to become f...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/flux/

flux

<radiobiology> The total amount of a quantity passing through a given surface per unit time. Typical quantities include (magnetic) field lines, particles, heat, energy, mass of fluid, etc. ... Common usage in plasma physics is for flux by itself to mean magnetic field flux, unless specified otherwise. ... (09 Oct 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

flux

noun a state of uncertainty about what should be done (usually following some important event) preceding the establishment of a new direction of action; `the flux following the death of the emperor`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=flux

flux

fluxion noun a flow or discharge
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=flux

Flux

[biology] In general, flux in biology relates to movement of a substance between compartments. There are several cases where the concept of flux is important. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux_(biology)

Flux

[Galactik Football] The Flux is a fictional fluid/force used in Galactik Football when in action, allowing players to perform amazing feats of acrobatic and athletic prowess. It is portrayed in Galactik Football as a constantly shifting aura around the person using it, and although its primary use is for physical enhancement (i.e. increased...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux_(Galactik_Football)

Flux

[metabolism] Flux, or metabolic flux is the rate of turnover of molecules through a metabolic pathway. Flux is regulated by the enzymes involved in a pathway. Within cells, regulation of flux is vital for all metabolic pathways to regulate the metabolic pathway`s activity under different conditions. Flux is therefore of great interest in me...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux_(metabolism)

Flux

[metallurgy] In metallurgy, a flux (derived from Latin fluxus meaning `flow”), is a chemical cleaning agent, flowing agent, or purifying agent. Fluxes may have more than one function at a time. They are used in both extractive metallurgy and metal joining. Some of the earliest known fluxes were carbonate of soda, potash, charcoal, coke, b...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux_(metallurgy)

Flux

[quantum mechanics] The equerries listed below are officers of the Royal Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom in personal attendance upon the sovereign or senior members of the Royal Family. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux_(quantum_mechanics)

Flux

[software] Flux is a software suite released by Media Machines which consists of Flux Player and Flux Studio. Flux Player is a VRML/X3D viewer that works both as plugin in Internet Explorer, and as standalone program in Windows. Flux Studio is a VRML/X3D editor that works in Windows. Both programs supports Windows Me/2000 and higher. Flux P...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux_(software)

Flux

[Electronics Production] A chemical agent used for cleaning, wetting improvement and protection of a solder connection.
Found on https://piek.international/terminology/

Flux

Flux (flŭks) noun [ Latin fluxus , from fluere , fluxum , to flow: confer French flux . See Fluent , and confer 1st & 2d Floss , Flush , noun , 6.] 1. The act of flowing; a continuous moving on or passing by, as...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/50

Flux

Flux adjective [ Latin fluxus , past participle of fluere . See Flux , noun ] Flowing; unstable; inconstant; variable. « The flux nature of all things here.» Barrow.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/50

Flux

Flux transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Fluxed (flŭkst); present participle & verbal noun Fluxing .] 1. To affect, or bring to a certain state, by flux. « He might fashionably and genteelly . . . have been ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/50

Flux

1. A flowing or flow. 2. A substance used to help metals fuse together.
Found on http://www.epa.gov/OCEPAterms/
No exact match found