Field

(1) On a data medium or a storage device, a specified area used for a particular class of data, for example, a group of character positions used to enter or display wage rates on a screen. (2) A discrete piece of data within a database record, for example, a street name. (3) The smallest identifiable part of a record.
Found on http://www.nmoa.org/Library/index.htm

field

(fēld) an area or open space, as an operative field or visual field. a range of specialization in knowledge, study, or occupation. in embryology, the developing region within a range of modifying factors.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

field

(from the article `algebra`) A main question pursued by Dedekind was the precise identification of those subsets of the complex numbers for which some generalized version of the ... ...the topological methods of Poincaré and Lefschetz so long as the manifolds were defined by equations whose coefficients were complex numbers. But,...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/22

field

(from the article `baseball`) ...(if a designated hitter is allowed to take the pitcher`s turn at bat) 10 players each. The field of play is divided into the infield and the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/22

field

(from the article `baseball`) Field of play and equipmentThe field for U.S. gridiron football is 120 yards (109.8 metres) long (including two 10-yard [9.1-metre] end zones) and 53.33 yards (48.8 metres) ... The field is 110 yards (about 100 m) long and 60 yards wide. The goals are 80 yards apart, the goal posts being 6 feet (1.8 m) high...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/22

field

(from the article `database`) ...a set of files on magnetic disk or tape, optical disk, or some other secondary storage device. The information in these files may be broken down ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/22

field

(from the article `heraldry`) In a blazon (verbal description) of the arms, their field, or background layer, appears first. It may be one of the metals or (gold) or argent ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/22

field

(from the article `physical science, principles of`) Newton`s law of gravitation and Coulomb`s electrostatic law both give the force between two particles as inversely proportional to the square of ... Faraday`s conception of electric and magnetic effects laid the groundwork for Maxwell`s equations. Faraday visualized electric charges a...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/22

field

[n] - the space around a radiating body within which its electromagnetic oscillations can exert force on another similar body not in contact with it 2. [n] - a geographic region (land or sea) under which something valuable is found 3. [n] - a piece of land cleared of trees and usually enclosed 4. [n] - somewhere (away from a stud...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=field

Field

• (v. i.) To stand out in the field, ready to catch, stop, or throw the ball. • (n.) Cleared land; land suitable for tillage or pasture; cultivated ground; the open country. • (n.) The space covered by an optical instrument at one view. • (n.) A place where a battle is fought; also, the battle itself. • (n.) Any blank space...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/field/

field

<radiobiology> In physics, any macroscopic quantity which exists (and typically varies) throughout a region of space. Standard examples include Electric and Magnetic fields, velocity flow fields, gravitational fields, etc. ... (09 Oct 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

field

• (physics) A physical entity that is described by specifying the value of some quantity at every point of space and time. Alternatively, a region within which a particular type of force can be observed or experienced. Varieties of field include a gravitational field, electric field, magnetic f...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/F/field.html

field

theater noun a region in which active military operations are in progress; `the army was in the field awaiting action`; `he served in the Vietnam theater for three years`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=field

field

field of operation noun a particular kind of commercial enterprise; `they are outstanding in their field`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=field

field

(computing) In computing, a specific item of data. A field is usually part of a record, which in turn is part of a file
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0034321.html

field

(physics) In physics, region of space in which an object exerts a force on a separate object because of certain properties they both possess. For example, there is a force of attraction between any two objects that have mass when one is within the gravitational field of the other. Other fields...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0027331.html

Field

[agriculture] In agriculture, a field is an area of land, enclosed or otherwise, used for agricultural purposes such as: ==Language== In Australian and New Zealand English, any agricultural field may be called a paddock. If stock are grazed there, the space may be called a run, e.g. sheep run; cattle run. ==Gallery== File:Cows in green fiel...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_(agriculture)

Field

[Bourdieu] Field (champ) is one of the arbitrary concepts used by French social scientist Pierre Bourdieu. A field is a setting in which agents and their social positions are located. The position of each particular agent in the field is a result of interaction between the specific rules of the field, agent`s habitus and agent`s capital (so...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_(Bourdieu)

Field

[computer science] In computer science, data that has several parts can be divided into fields. Relational databases arrange data as sets of database records, also called rows. Each record consists of several fields; the fields of all records form the columns. In object-oriented programming, field (also called data member or member variable...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_(computer_science)

Field

[geography] In the context of spatial analysis, geographic information systems, and geographic information science, the term field has been adopted from physics, in which it denotes a quantity that can be theoretically assigned to any point of space, such as temperature or density. This use of field is synonymous with the spatially dependen...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_(geography)

Field

[heraldry] In heraldry, the background of the shield is called the `field`. The field is usually composed of one or more tinctures (colours or metals) or furs. The field may be divided or may consist of a variegated pattern. In rare modern cases the field (or a subdivision thereof) is not a tincture, but is shown as a scene from a landscape...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_(heraldry)

FIELD

[magazine] FIELD magazine is a twice-yearly literary magazine published by Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio, and focusing on contemporary poetry and poetics. FIELD has published spring and fall issues each year since its founding in 1969. Contributors have included Adrienne Rich, Charles Wright, Thomas Lux, and Franz Wright. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FIELD_(magazine)

Field

[mathematics] In abstract algebra, a field is a nonzero commutative ring that contains a multiplicative inverse for every nonzero element, or equivalently a ring whose nonzero elements form an abelian group under multiplication. As such it is an algebraic structure with notions of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division satisfyi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_(mathematics)

Field

[physics] A field is a physical quantity that has a value for each point in space and time. For example, in a weather forecast, the wind velocity is described by assigning a vector to each point on a map. Each vector represents the speed and direction of the movement of air at that point. A field can be classified as a scalar field, a vecto...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_(physics)

Field

[sculpture] Field (1991) is a sculpture by British artist Antony Gormley. It consists of approx. 35,000 individual terracotta figures, each between 8 and 26 cm high, installed on the floor of a room facing the viewer. The figures were sculpted in Cholula, Mexico by about 60 members of a Texca family of brickmakers, under the supervision of ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_(sculpture)
No exact match found