fever

(fe´vәr) an abnormally high body temperature; called also pyrexia. adj., fe´verish, fe´brile., adj. any disease characterized by marked increase of body temperature. See also heat exhaustion and heat stroke. For specific diseases, see the eponymic or descriptive name, such as Rocky Mountain spotte...
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Fever

(fevers) An abnormally high body temperature. Usually taken to mean a temperature above 38oC or 98.4oF.
Found on http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/utilities/glossary/index.htm?search=f

Fever

(from the article `Lee, Peggy`) ...during the decade included a version of Richard Rodgers and Moss Hart`s Lover (1952), with an audacious mambo-style arrangement by Gordon Jenkins, ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/21

fever

[n] - a rise in the temperature of the body 2. [n] - intense nervous anticipation
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Fever

• (n.) Excessive excitement of the passions in consequence of strong emotion; a condition of great excitement; as, this quarrel has set my blood in a fever. • (v. t.) To put into a fever; to affect with fever; as, a fevered lip. • (n.) A diseased state of the system, marked by increased heat, acceleration of the pulse, and a general ...
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fever

<clinical sign> A rise in body temperature above normal usually as a natural response to infection. Typically an oral temperature greater than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit constitutes a fever. ... (27 Sep 1997) ...
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fever

noun intense nervous anticipation; `in a fever of resentment`
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Fever

Fe'ver noun [ Middle English fever , fefer , Anglo-Saxon fefer , fefor , Latin febris : confer French fièvre . Confer Febrile .] 1. (Medicine) A diseased state of the system, marked by increased heat, acceleration of the pulse, and a g...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/24

Fever

Fe'ver transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Fevered ; present participle & verbal noun Fevering .] To put into a fever; to affect with fever; as, a fevered lip. [ R.] « The white hand of a lady fever thee.&#x...
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Fever

A body temperature above 98.6°F (37°C). Fever is not an illness or a diagnosis, but is frequently a symptom of an infection as the immune system works to fight off any infection that can be occuring. Narrower term(s): Intrapartum Fever Puerperal Fever Childbed Fever
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Fever

A fever is when you have a high body temperature (over 38C or 100.4F).
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FEVER

A rise in body temperature caused by a change in the thermoregulatory set-point in the brain; usually caused by disease.
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fever

abnormally high bodily temperature or a disease of which an abnormally high temperature is characteristic. Although most often associated with ... [6 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/21

Fever

Although a fever technically is any body temperature above the normal of 98.6 degrees F. (37 degrees C.), in practice a person is usually not considered to have a significant fever until the temperature is above 100.4 degrees F (38 degrees C.).
Found on http://www.emedicinehealth.com/allergy_insect_sting/glossary_em.htm

Fever

Although a fever technically is any body temperature above the normal of 98.6 degrees F. (37 degrees C.), in practice a person is usually not considered to have a significant fever until the temperature is above 100.4 degrees F (38 degrees C.).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21531

Fever

Although a fever technically is any body temperature above the normal of 98.6 degrees F. (37 degrees
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22417

fever

An increase in body temperature above normal (98.6 degrees F), usually caused by disease.
Found on http://www.cancer.gov/dictionary?expand=F

fever

Condition of raised body temperature, usually due to infection
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fever

Elevation of the body temperature above the normal 37°C (98.6°F). It is mostly caused by bacterial or viral infection and can accompany virtually any infectious disease. Inflammation, heat stroke, and some tumors are also important causes. Fever is produced by pyrogens, which are derived fro...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/F/fever.html

fever

fever Elevation of body temperature above the normal. It may be due to physiological stresses; such as, ovulation, excess thyroid hormone secretions, or vigorous exercise; to central nervous system lesions, or infection by microorganisms; or to any of a host of noninfectious processes; such as, inflammation or the release of certain materials, as ...
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Fever

Fever is an abnormally high body temperature, accompanied by a fast pulse rate and dry skin,
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fever

Fever occurs when body temperature rises above its normal level - usually defined as 98.6 degrees F/37 degrees C, although this varies by individual and time of day. A fever is a sign of the immune system at work and usually indicates an infection.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20423

fever

fever, elevation of body temperature above the normal level, which in humans is about 98°F (37°C) when measured orally. Fever is considered to be a symptom of a disorder rather than a disease in itself. Under normal conditions the heat that is generated by the burning of food by the body is ...
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Fever

In dogs, a body temperature reading over 103ƒ.
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Fever

Normal body temperature for a healthy adult lies between 36° and 38° Celsius ( 96.8° and 100.4° Fahrenheit). Body temperature above 38° C (100.4° F) is considered to be fever.
Found on http://www.ibs-relief.co.uk/glossary.html
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