fallacy

[n] - a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=fallacy

fallacy

In philosophy, a type of mistake in reasoning or inference (deduction or conclusion drawn from what has been implied). In Aristotelian logic (syllogism) and in modern...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Fallacy

Fal'la·cy (făl'lȧ*sȳ) noun ; plural Fallacies (- sĭz). [ Middle English fallace , fallas , deception, French fallace , from Latin fallacia , from fallax deceitful, deceptive, from fallere to deceive. See Fail ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/5

fallacy

false belief noun a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=fallacy

Fallacy

• (n.) Deceptive or false appearance; deceitfulness; that which misleads the eye or the mind; deception. • (n.) An argument, or apparent argument, which professes to be decisive of the matter at issue, while in reality it is not; a sophism.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/fallacy/

fallacy

in logic, erroneous reasoning that has the appearance of soundness. Among numerous types of logical fallacies that have been noted, some of the ... [6 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/5

fallacy

fallacy, in logic, a term used to characterize an invalid argument. Strictly speaking, it refers only to the transition from a set of premises to a conclusion, and is distinguished from falsity, a value attributed to a single statement. The laws of syllogisms were systematically elaborated by Aristo...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0818195.html

Fallacy

is any unsound step or process of reasoning, especially one which has a deceptive appearance of soundness or is falsely accepted as sound. The unsoundness may consist either in a mistake of formal logic, or in the suppression of a premiss whose unacceptability might have been recognized if it had been stated, or in a lack of genuine adaptation of ....
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Fallacy

In logic, a fallacy is when an argument is used as decisive of a particular issue, which in reality it does not decide. Properly a fallacy is a fault in the form of reasoning, but the term is applied also to faults in the substance of the argument such as the petitio principii, or proving one proposition by assuming another which is identical with ...
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FALLACY

A fallacy is a mistake in reasoning. A fallacious ARGUMENT is not a VALID argument.
Found on http://www.abdn.ac.uk/philosophy/guide/glossary.shtml

Fallacy

A fallacy is an argument that uses poor reasoning. An argument can be fallacious whether or not its conclusion is true. A fallacy can be either formal or informal. An error that stems from a poor logical form is sometimes called a formal fallacy or simply an invalid argument. An informal fallacy is an error in reasoning that does not originate in ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fallacy

fallacy

a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/149640

Fallacy

any sort of mistake in reasoning or inference (essentially, anything that causes an argument to go wrong).
Found on http://www.philosophybasics.com/general_glossary.html

fallacy

a mistake in the formal* structure of an argument used to draw a conclusion based on some evidence. A fallacious argument may appear to prove something that is not actually true. Aristotle was the first to give a systematic* account of the various types of logical* fallacies.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary078.htm
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