excess

  1. a quantity much larger than is needed
  2. immoderation as a consequence of going beyond sufficient or permitted limits
  3. the state of being more than full

excess

[Noun] Bigger or more than usual.
Example: At Christmas parties, the boss always drank to excess.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

excess

See deductible.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20197

excess

[adj] - more than is needed, desired, or required 2. [n] - a quantity much larger than is needed 3. [n] - immoderation as a consequence of going beyond sufficient or permitted limits
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=excess

Excess

Applies to an insurance claim and is simply the first part of any claim that must be covered by yourself. This can range from £50 to £1000 or higher. Increasing your excess can significantly reduce your premium. On the other hand, a waiver can sometimes be paid to eliminate any excess at all. Always check the excess in your policy.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20452

Excess

Applies to an insurance claim. Simply the first part of any claim that must be covered by yourself.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20662

Excess

The specified amount a policyholder must bear before the insurers pay a claim. The inclusion of an... <a target=_blank href='http://www.finance-glossary.com/terms/excess.htm?id=510&ginPtrCode=00000&PopupMode=false' title='Read full definition of excess'>more</a>
Found on http://www.finance-glossary.com/pages/home.htm

Excess

Ex·cess' noun [ Middle English exces , excess , ecstasy, Latin excessus a going out, loss of self- possession, from excedere , excessum , to go out, go beyond: confer French excès . See Exceed .] 1. The state of surpassing or going beyond li...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/E/82

excess

1. The state of surpassing or going beyond limits; the being of a measure beyond sufficiency, necessity, or duty; that which exceeds what is usual or prover; immoderateness; superfluity; superabundance; extravagance; as, an excess of provisions or of light. 'To gild refined gold, to paint the lily, To throw a perfume on the violet, . . . Is wastefu...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

excess

extra adjective more than is needed, desired, or required; `trying to lose excess weight`; `found some extra change lying on the dresser`; `yet another book on heraldry might be thought redundant`; `skills made redundant by technological advance`; `sleepin...
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=excess

excess

excessiveness noun immoderation as a consequence of going beyond sufficient or permitted limits
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=excess

excess

surplusage noun a quantity much larger than is needed
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=excess

excess

overabundance noun the state of being more than full
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=excess

excess

(ek-ses´) (ek´ses) an amount more than is normal or necessary.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Excess

• (n.) The degree or amount by which one thing or number exceeds another; remainder; as, the difference between two numbers is the excess of one over the other. • (n.) An undue indulgence of the appetite; transgression of proper moderation in natural gratifications; intemperance; dissipation. • (n.) The state of surpassing or going b...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/excess/

excess

excess (ik SES) 1. Surpassing limits, surplus, extra, overflow: 'The excess furniture was stored in the cellar.' 2. Superabundance, surplus, overabundance, too much, oversupply, plethora, glut: 'The boy had an excess of energy.' Some people always confuse access and excess. Access is a way of getting to something or someone; excess is a...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3291/

excess

Type: Term Pronunciation: ek′ses Definitions: 1. That which is more than the usual or specified amount.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=30872

Excess

The amount you'll have to pay before your building or contents insurance policy kicks in to cover any claim you might make. For example, if your property is water damaged, you may have to pay the first
Found on http://www.woolwich.co.uk/mortgages/mortgage-glossary.html
No exact match found