Envelope

1) Jargon for Lamp. 2) The glass tube part of the lamp, containing the filament.

envelope

  1. a flat rectangular paper container for papers
  2. any wrapper or covering
  3. a curve that is tangent to each of a family of curves
  4. a natural covering (as by a fluid)
  5. the maximum operating capability of a system
  6. the bag containing the gas in a balloon

envelope

(1) Lipoprotein outer layer of some viruses - derived from plasma membrane of the host cell. (2) In bacteriology, the plasma membrane and cell wall complex of a bacterium.

Envelope

An envelope is a common packaging item, usually made of thin flat material. It is designed to contain a flat object, such as a letter or card. Traditional envelopes are made from sheets of paper cut to one of three shapes: a rhombus, a short-arm cross, or a kite. These shapes allow for the creation of the envelope structure by folding the sheet si...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Envelope

envelope

(en´vә-lōp) an encompassing structure or membrane. in virology, the outer lipoprotein coat of a large virus, surrounding the capsid and usually furnished, at least partially, by the host cell. Called also peplos. in bacteriology, the cell wall and the plasma membrane considered together....
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

envelope

(from the article `Huygens` principle`) A surface tangent to the wavelets constitutes the new wave front and is called the envelope of the wavelets. If a medium is homogeneous and has the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/34

envelope

(from the article `motion-picture technology`) The modern era in lighting began in the late 1960s when tungsten-halogen lamps with quartz envelopes came into wide use. The halogen compound is ... Electric discharge lamps, in which enclosed gases are energized by an applied voltage and thereby made to glow, are extremely efficient light ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/34

envelope

(from the article `singular solution`) ...of the differential equation, but it is not a member of the family constituting the general solution. The singular solution is related to the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/34

envelope

(from the article `virus`) ...into a structure called a nucleoprotein, or nucleocapsid. Some viruses have more than one layer of protein surrounding the nucleic acid; still ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/34

envelope

[n] - a curve that is tangent to each of a family of curves 2. [n] - a natural covering (as by a fluid) 3. [n] - the maximum operating capability of a system 4. [n] - the bag containing the gas in a balloon 5. [n] - a flat rectangular paper container for papers 6. [n] - any wrapper or covering
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=envelope

Envelope

• (n.) Alt. of Envelop
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/envelope/

envelope

• (astron.) A cloud of gas and dust that surrounds one or more stars or some other astronomical object. Young, hot stars often eject envelopes or produce them by ionizing nearby material. Old stars, in their red giant phase, shed their outer layers and produce cool envelopes rich in molecules a...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/E/envelope.html

envelope

noun the bag containing the gas in a balloon
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=envelope

envelope

noun any wrapper or covering
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=envelope

Envelope

[lighter-than-air craft] This category includes sub-categories that contain articles related to the creation of public foreign policy and the management of international relations as a result of the adopted foreign policy strategies and postures, with the posture determining the foreign policy doctrine of the national government. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Envelope_(lighter-than-air_craft)

Envelope

[mathematics] In geometry, an envelope of a family of curves in the plane is a curve that is tangent to each member of the family at some point. Classically, a point on the envelope can be thought of as the intersection of two `adjacent` curves, meaning the limit of intersections of nearby curves. This idea can be generalized to an envelope...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Envelope_(mathematics)

Envelope

[motion] In mechanical engineering, an envelope is a solid representing all positions which may be occupied by an object during its normal range of motion. Another (jargon) word for this is a `flop`. ==Wheel envelope== In automobile design, a wheel envelope may be used to model all positions a wheel and tire combo may be expected to occupy ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Envelope_(motion)

Envelope

[radar] Radar envelope is a critical Measure of Performance (MOP) identified in the Test and Evaluation Master Plan (TEMP). This is the volume of space where a radar system is required to reliably detect an object with a specific size and speed. This is one of the requirements that must be evaluated as part of the acceptance testing process...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Envelope_(radar)

Envelope

[waves] In physics and engineering, the envelope function of a rapidly varying signal is a smooth curve outlining its extremes in amplitude. The figure illustrates a sine wave varying between an upper and a lower envelope. The envelope function may be a function of time, space, angle, or indeed of any variable. ==Example: Beating waves== If...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Envelope_(waves)

envelope

1. <virology> Lipoprotein outer layer of some viruses derived from plasma membrane of the host cell. ... 2. <microbiology> The plasma membrane and cell wall complex of a bacterium. ... (11 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Envelope

1) How a sound or audio signal varies in intensity over a time span.
2) How a control voltage varies in level over time controlling a parameter of something other than gain or audio level.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

Envelope

A continuous membrane edge seal formed at the perimeter and at penetrations by folding the base sheet or ply over the plies above and securing it to the top of the membrane. The envelope prevents bitumen seepage from the edge of the membrane.
Found on http://www.rbroof.com/glossary-of-terms

Envelope

A graphical plot indicating the maximum magnitude of an internal force effect such as flexual stess, shear stress, axial stress, torsional stress, etc. due to a series of load combinations.
Found on http://www.areforum.org/up/GeneralStructures/JOIST%20AND%20STRUCTURAL%20GLO

envelope

a group of binary digits formed by a n-bit byte augmented by a number of additional bits which are required for the operation of the data network
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=721-19-25

envelope

A shape that changes as a function of time. The shape of a synthesizer's envelope is controlled by a set of rate (or time) and level parameters. The envelope is a control signal that can be applied to various aspects of a synth sound, such as pitch, filter cutoff frequency, and overall amplitude. Usually, each note has its own envelope(s).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22285
No exact match found