envelope

(1) Lipoprotein outer layer of some viruses - derived from plasma membrane of the host cell. (2) In bacteriology, the plasma membrane and cell wall complex of a bacterium.

Envelope

The outermost layers of a cell or the membrane of a virus.

Envelope

1) Jargon for Lamp. 2) The glass tube part of the lamp, containing the filament.

Envelope

[radar] Radar envelope is a critical Measure of Performance (MOP) identified in the Test and Evaluation Master Plan (TEMP). This is the volume of space where a radar system is required to reliably detect an object with a specific size and speed. This is one of the requirements that must be evaluated as part of the acceptance testing process...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Envelope_(radar)

Envelope

[waves] In physics and engineering, the envelope function of a rapidly varying signal is a smooth curve outlining its extremes in amplitude. The figure illustrates a sine wave varying between an upper and a lower envelope. The envelope function may be a function of time, space, angle, or indeed of any variable. ==Example: Beating waves== If...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Envelope_(waves)

Envelope

[lighter-than-air craft] This category includes sub-categories that contain articles related to the creation of public foreign policy and the management of international relations as a result of the adopted foreign policy strategies and postures, with the posture determining the foreign policy doctrine of the national government. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Envelope_(lighter-than-air_craft)

Envelope

The envelope is the part of the balloon that inflates. It is made up of a number of vertical segments called gores, which are themselves made up of a number of smaller panels. Each panel edge is folded back on itself, interleaved with the next folded edge, and then all four thicknesses of fabric are sewn through twice by machine using a lockstitch ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20160

envelope

[n] - a curve that is tangent to each of a family of curves 2. [n] - a natural covering (as by a fluid) 3. [n] - the maximum operating capability of a system 4. [n] - the bag containing the gas in a balloon 5. [n] - a flat rectangular paper container for papers 6. [n] - any wrapper or covering
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=envelope

Envelope

1) How a sound or audio signal varies in intensity over a time span.
2) How a control voltage varies in level over time controlling a parameter of something other than gain or audio level.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

Envelope

In audio recording software this refers to the way in which the level of a sound or signal varies over time, including alterations in a sound's amplitude, frequency and timbre. In MIDI, an instrument can be altered by manipulating the envelope which contains parameters such as attack, sustain, decay and release. (See ASDR). Using patch editing ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20532

Envelope

changes in a sound over time, including alterations in a sound's amplitude, frequency and timbre. Used in sound synthesis to control the volume, pan, pitch or other attribute of sound over a period of time. ADSR envelopes are the most commonly used type of envelope. They are divided into several segments, Attack, Decay, Sustain and Release. The att...
Found on http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/music%20tech%20glossary/Music%20Tech%20Gl

Envelope

The gas container of a balloon or airship or the outer cover surrounding the gas bags.
Found on http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/glossary/

Envelope

Paper that is folded and glued in a wide variety of sizes and shapes, for containing letter of other materials. Many printing jobs will end up in an envelope. The closer a finished piece is to an envelope size, the easier it will be to mail and the less chance it will be damaged by jostling around inside the envelope. An envelope maker can make jus...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20829

envelope

1. <virology> Lipoprotein outer layer of some viruses derived from plasma membrane of the host cell. ... 2. <microbiology> The plasma membrane and cell wall complex of a bacterium. ... (11 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

envelope

noun any wrapper or covering
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=envelope

envelope

noun the bag containing the gas in a balloon
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=envelope

envelope

(en´vә-lōp) an encompassing structure or membrane. in virology, the outer lipoprotein coat of a large virus, surrounding the capsid and usually furnished, at least partially, by the host cell. Called also peplos. in bacteriology, the cell wall and the plasma membrane considered together....
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Envelope

• (n.) Alt. of Envelop
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/envelope/

envelope

(from the article `virus`) ...into a structure called a nucleoprotein, or nucleocapsid. Some viruses have more than one layer of protein surrounding the nucleic acid; still ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/34

envelope

(from the article `motion-picture technology`) The modern era in lighting began in the late 1960s when tungsten-halogen lamps with quartz envelopes came into wide use. The halogen compound is ... Electric discharge lamps, in which enclosed gases are energized by an applied voltage and thereby made to glow, are extremely efficient light ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/34

envelope

(from the article `singular solution`) ...of the differential equation, but it is not a member of the family constituting the general solution. The singular solution is related to the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/34

envelope

(from the article `Huygens` principle`) A surface tangent to the wavelets constitutes the new wave front and is called the envelope of the wavelets. If a medium is homogeneous and has the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/34

envelope

in musical sound, the attack, sustain, and decay of a sound. Attack transients consist of changes occurring before the sound reaches its steady-state ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/34

envelope

in poetry, a device in which a line or a stanza is repeated so as to enclose a section of verse, as in Sir Thomas Wyatt`s `Is it Possible?`:Is it ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/34

Envelope

The outermost points traced out by a moving curve.
Found on http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alandear/glossary/e.html
No exact match found