DUST

To sprinkle food with dry ingredients. Use a strainer or a jar with a perforated cover, or try the good, old-fashioned way of shaking things together in a paper bag.

Dust

A commonly used term for fine hard rock quarried aggregates. After all single sizes have been screened off down to 6mm the remaining material-passing 6.3mm is dust. Some times this can be screened again to produce a fine dust and 3mm single size.

Dust

A pesticide formulation in dry, finely-divided form (with particle size less than 30 µm) designed for application as a dry dressing without further preparation or dilution.

Dust

Sprinkling flour on a work surface to evenly coat it, or as with spices, sugar, or bread crumbs, light coating a food item.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21216

Dust

To sprinkle lightly with a powder.
Found on http://www.wrenscottage.com/kitchen/glossary.php

Dust

To sprinkle with sugar or flour.
Found on http://www.chowbaby.com/10_2000/glossary/glossary.html?synchpage=10&Z=75017

dust

[n] - free microscopic particles of solid material 2. [n] - fine powdery material such as dry earth or pollen that can be blown about in the air 3. [v] - cover with a light dusting of a substance 4. [v] - rub the dust over a surface so as to blur the outlines of a shape 5. [v] - remove the dust from, as of furniture
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=dust

Dust

To sprinkle lightly with flour, cornflour or icing sugar.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21220

Dust

Small solid particles generated (usually) by mechanical attrition. See Respirable Dust, Thoracic Dust and Total Inhalable Dust.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20474

dust

Dust particles can enter the body of a D-SLR camera when lenses are changed, settling on the CCD sensor and causing ‘spotting` on the image.
Found on http://www.sony.co.uk/glossary/ShowGlossary.action?site=odw_en_GB§ionty

Dust

Light particles suspended in air
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20746

Dust

Dust tiny, free pieces of fiber, filler, and/or coating on paper. During printing, dust may adhere to the blanket and create imperfections by not allowing ink to reach the paper surface.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20829

Dust

Dust (dŭst) noun [ Anglo-Saxon dust ; confer LG. dust , Dutch duist meal dust, OD. doest , donst , and German dunst vapor, Old High German tunist , dunist , a blowing, wind, Icelandic dust dust, Danish dyst mill dust; per...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/133

Dust

Dust transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Dusted ; present participle & verbal noun Dusting .] 1. To free from dust; to brush, wipe, or sweep away dust from; as, to dust a table or a floor. 2. To sprinkle...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/133

dust

1. Fine, dry particles of earth or other matter, so comminuted that they may be raised and wafted by the wind; that which is crumbled too minute portions; fine powder; as, clouds of dust; bone dust. 'Dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return.' (Gen. Iii. 19) 'Stop! for thy tread is on an empire's dust.' (Byron) ... 2. A single particle of eart...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

dust

noun fine powdery material such as dry earth or pollen that can be blown about in the air; `the furniture was covered with dust`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=dust

dust

(dust) fine, dry particles of earth or any other substance small enough to be blown by the wind. See also coniosis and pneumoconiosis. blood dust hemoconia.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Dust

• (n.) The earthy remains of bodies once alive; the remains of the human body. • (n.) A single particle of earth or other matter. • (v. t.) To sprinkle with dust. • (n.) Coined money; cash. • (n.) Figuratively, a low or mean condition. • (n.) Fine, dry particles of earth or other matter, so comminuted that they may be ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/dust/

dust

(from the article `occupational disease`) The inhalation of a variety of dusts is responsible for a number of lung and respiratory disorders, whose symptoms and severity depend on the ... Dust cannot cause infectious disease unless it contains the living agents of the infection. Yet the term inanimate is a convenient one to use when ......
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/85

Dust

A solid, mechanically produced particle with a size ranging from submicroscopic to macroscopic. NIOSH Definition
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary062.htm

DUST

Small particles of earth or other matter suspended in the air. It is reported as 'DU' in an observation and for wide spread dust on the METAR.
Found on http://www.weather.com/glossary/d.html

dust

particulate in suspension in a gas that would have a gravitational settling velocity in air greater than 0,25 m/s NOTE - Equivalent aerodynamic diameter of dust is generally included between 100 µm to 2 mm.
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=393-11-39

Dust

The smallest grade of tea, often used in tea bags because it creates a quick infusion.
Found on http://www.hungrymonster.com/Foodfacts/Tea_Glossary.cfm

Dust

Dust is English slang for to run away very fast.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZD.HTM

Dust

Loose fine particles on the surface. Dust Examples
Found on http://www.art-conservation.org/GLOSS_Paint.htm
No exact match found