domain

Used to describe a part of a molecule or structure that shares common physicochemical features, eg. hydrophobic, polar, globular, a -helical domains, or properties eg. DNA-binding domain, ATP-binding domain.

Domain

Partly autonomous substructure in a protein molecule, with self-contained secondary structure/stabilising features and sometimes wholly self-originating functional contributions.

Domain

The part of the external world, including users and inmates of the system that effects and is affected by the system.

Domain

A cluster of atoms in a ferromagnetic substance, all of which align in the same direction in the presence of an external magnetic field.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/10003

Domain

The part of the Internet address that specifies your computer's location in the world. The address is written as a series of names separated by full stops. The most common top level domains:.edu education (US).net network resource.com commercial (US) .gov public bodies
Found on http://www.mantex.co.uk/samples/glo-1.htm

domain

The set from which values are selected.
Found on http://www.testingstandards.co.uk/living_glossary.htm

domain

[n] - the set of values of the independent variable for which a function is defined 2. [n] - territory over which rule or control is exercised 3. [n] - a knowledge domain that you are interested in or are communicating about
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=domain

Domain

One of the elements that comprise a DNS address. Domain names are divided into different categories: .com, .net, .org, .edu, .fr, .uk, etc.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20441

Domain

a group of computers sharing the same set of services, usually a company wide address - a domain is the list of hosts in one specific part of the Net, and can be as little as one host or as much as the complete Net
Found on http://www.archivemag.co.uk/

Domain

A cluster of atoms in a ferromagnetic substance, all of which align in the same direction in the presence of an external magnetic field.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20728

Domain

Domain: In molecular biology, a discrete portion of a protein with its own function. The combination of domains in a single protein determines its overall function. (Not to be confused with an Internet domain.)
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=3104

Domain

An area of a network over which administrative control is exercised. The primary domain is the file server for all clients.
Found on http://www.rodsmith.org.uk/photographic%20glossary/rods%20photographic%20gl

Domain

Do·main' noun [ French domaine , Old French demaine , Latin dominium , property, right of ownership, from dominus master, owner. See Dame , and cf Demesne , Dungeon .] 1. Dominion; empire; authority. 2. The territory over which domi...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/108

domain

<molecular biology> Used to describe a part of a molecule or structure that shares common physico chemical features, for example hydrophobic, polar, globular, helical domains or properties for example DNA binding domain, ATP binding domain. ... (18 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

domain

region noun a knowledge domain that you are interested in or are communicating about; `it was a limited domain of discourse`; `here we enter the region of opinion`; `the realm of the occult`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=domain

domain

demesne noun territory over which rule or control is exercised; `his domain extended into Europe`; `he made it the law of the land`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=domain

domain

noun people in general; especially a distinctive group of people with some shared interest; `the Western world`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=domain

domain

(do-mān´) an area or region that is defined or delimited in some way. one of the three broad divisions into which all living organisms may be classified: the Archaea, the Bacteria, and the Eucarya; the first two consist of the prokaryotes, whereas the last contains the eukaryotes. This system is an alternat...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Domain

• (n.) Landed property; estate; especially, the land about the mansion house of a lord, and in his immediate occupancy; demesne. • (n.) Ownership of land; an estate or patrimony which one has in his own right; absolute proprietorship; paramount or sovereign ownership. • (n.) Dominion; empire; authority. • (n.) The territory over...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/domain/

domain

(from the article `formal logic`) ...intuitive notion more precisely can be given as follows: for any wff of LPC, any number of LPC models can be formed. An LPC model has two ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/64

domain

(from the article `immune system`) The variable and constant regions of both the light and the heavy chains are structurally folded into functional units called domains. Each light ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/64

domain

in Anglo-American law, the absolute and complete ownership of land, or the land itself which is so owned. Domain is the fullest and most superior ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/64

domain

domain 1. The scope of a subject. 2. An area of activity over which somebody has influence. 3. Territory ruled by a government or a leader. 4. An area of land owned and controlled by a person, family, or organization. 5. In law, rights relating to the ownership of land. 6. In computerese, domain name, the sequence of words, phrases, abbreviation......
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/666/2

Domain

A compact segment of an immunoglobulin molecule, made up of about 110 amino acids around an S-S bond, and encoded by a unique segment of DNA, surrounded by nontranslated sequences.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21016

domain

Type: Term Pronunciation: dō-mān′ Definitions: 1. Homologous unit of approximately 110-120 amino acids, groups of which make up the light and heavy chains of the immunoglobulin molecule; each serves a specific function. The light chain has two domains, one in the variable region and one in the constant region of the chain; the heavy...
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=26418
No exact match found