discourse

  1. extended verbal expression in speech or writing
  2. an address of a religious nature (usually delivered during a church service)
  3. an extended communication (often interactive) dealing with some particular topic

discourse

speech lecture 
Found on http://www.graduateshotline.com/list.html

discourse

not an easy term to get to grips with, partly because it is used differently in different subject areas. In linguistics the term is commonly used to refer to an utterance larger than a single sentenceIn interpersonal communication, 'discourse analysis' refers to the analysis of the verbal and non-verbal aspects of an interaction; it analyses the ve...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20164

discourse

[n] - extended verbal expression in speech or writing 2. [v] - to consider or examine in speech or writing 3. [v] - talk or hold forth formally about a topic
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=discourse

discourse

an ordered and structured use of language which organizes the way in which people see their world.
Found on http://www.polity.co.uk/cbs3/PDF/Glos.pdf

Discourse

(Discourse / discourse analysis / discourse structure) This is a word that can lead to much confusion. When language is used in the real world by people who are using it to communicate their thoughts, whether it is spoken or written, they produce a piece of discourse. Discourse analysis is, therefore, an analysis of such a stretch of language. A ...
Found on http://www.englishbiz.co.uk/grammar/main_files/definitionsa-m.htm

Discourse

has come to refer, under the influence of Foucault, to systems of knowledge and their associated practices. More narrowly, it is used by discourse analysts to refer to particular systems of language, with a characteristic terminology and underlying knowledge base, such as medical talk, psychological language, or the language of democratic politics....
Found on http://people.brunel.ac.uk/~hsstcfs/glossary.htm

Discourse

Dis·course' noun [ Latin discursus a running to and fro, discourse, from discurrere , discursum , to run to and fro, to discourse; dis- + currere to run: confer French discours . See Course .] 1. The power of the mind to reason or infer by ru...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/79

Discourse

Dis·course' intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Discoursed ; present participle & verbal noun Discoursing .] 1. To exercise reason; to employ the mind in judging and inferring; to reason. [ Obsolete] 'Have sense or can...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/79

Discourse

Dis·course' transitive verb 1. To treat of; to expose or set forth in language. [ Obsolete] « The life of William Tyndale . . . is sufficiently and at large discoursed in the book.» Foxe. 2. To utter or give forth; to speak. « It will discourse
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/79

discourse

verb to consider or examine in speech or writing; `The article covered all the different aspects of this question`; `The class discussed Dante`s `Inferno``
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=discourse

Discourse

• (v. i.) To treat of something in writing and formally. • (v. i.) To relate something; to tell. • (n.) The power of the mind to reason or infer by running, as it were, from one fact or reason to another, and deriving a conclusion; an exercise or act of this power; reasoning; range of reasoning faculty. • (v. t.) To utter or giv...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/discourse/

Discourse

Orderly communication of thought, or the power to think logically. -- C.A.B.
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/d.html

discourse

Spoken or written intercommunication. In linguistics, the term describes a group of sentences
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0038694.html

Discourse

[disambiguation] Discourse is a use of written or spoken communication. Discourse or discourses may also refer to: == Literature == == Other uses == ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discourse_(disambiguation)

Discourse

Discourse ({ety|la|discursus|running to and from}) denotes written and spoken communications such as: An enouncement ({ety|fr|l’énoncé|the statement}) is not a unit of semiotic signs, but an abstract construct that allows the signs to assign and communicate specific, repeatable relations to, between, and among objects, subjects, and statements...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discourse

discourse

written or spoken language, especially when it is studied in order to understand how people use language
Found on http://www.macmillandictionaries.com/features/glossary/dictionary-terms/

discourse

(story) How a story compares to every other work, event, and concept in the world. Topics include creativity, series, and transmediality.
Found on http://critical-gaming.com/critical-glossary/

Discourse

Socially-based belief structures. The viewer brings discourses to the reading of the television text
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Technology/Television_%28TV%29/

Discourse

[software] Discourse is an open source Internet forum software application founded in 2013 by Jeff Atwood, Robin Ward, and Sam Saffron. Discourse received funding from First Round Capital and Greylock. From a usability perspective, Discourse breaks with existing forum software by including features recently popularized by large social netwo...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discourse_(software)
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