dimension

(from the article `mechanics`) Quantities have both dimensions, which are an expression of their fundamental nature, and units, which are chosen by convention to express magnitude ... Centuries of experimental research led to a more tenable conception in which space was described in terms of three dimensions or planes: height ... [2 ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/50

Dimension

(scientific) 1. Any linear series or order of elements. 2. Any quantity of a given kind, capable of increase or decrease over a certain range, a variable. 3. In the physical system: mass, length and time. -- A.C.B.
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/d.html

dimension

[n] - one of three cartesian coordinates that determine a position in space 2. [n] - the magnitude of something in a particular direction (especially length or width or height) 3. [v] - indicate the dimensions on 4. [v] - shape or form to required dimensions
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=dimension

Dimension

• (n.) The manifoldness with which the fundamental units of time, length, and mass are involved in determining the units of other physical quantities. • (n.) Measure in a single line, as length, breadth, height, thickness, or circumference; extension; measurement; -- usually, in the plural, measure in length and breadth, or in length, bre...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/dimension/

dimension

noun the magnitude of something in a particular direction (especially length or width or height)
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Dimension

[company] The Dimension division of Stratasys manufactures 3D printing equipment which uses fused deposition modeling (FDM). A Dimension 3D printer is available at TechShop for member use. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimension_(company)

Dimension

[data warehouse] A dimension is a structure that categorizes facts and measures in order to enable users to answer business questions. Commonly used dimensions are people, products, place and time. In a data warehouse, Dimensions provide structured labeling information to otherwise unordered numeric measures. The dimension is a data set com...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimension_(data_warehouse)

Dimension

[graph theory] This concept was introduced in 1965 by Paul Erdős, Frank Harary and William Tutte. It generalises the concept of unit distance graph to more than 2 dimensions. == Examples == === Complete graph === == Dimension and chromatic number == ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimension_(graph_theory)

Dimension

[mathematics and physics] In physics and mathematics, the dimension of a space or object is informally defined as the minimum number of coordinates needed to specify any point within it. Thus a line has a dimension of one because only one coordinate is needed to specify a point on it (for example, the point at 5 on a number line). A surface...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimension_(mathematics_and_physics)

Dimension

[metadata] In metadata, dimension is a set of equivalent units of measure, where equivalence between two units of measure is determined by the existence of a quantity preserving one-to-one correspondence between values measured in one unit of measure and values measured in the other unit of measure, independent of context, and where charact...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimension_(metadata)

Dimension

[vector space] In mathematics, the dimension of a vector space V is the cardinality (i.e. the number of vectors) of a basis of V over its base field.{efn|It is sometimes called Hamel dimension or algebraic dimension to distinguish it from other types of dimension.} For every vector space there exists a basis,{efn|if one assumes the axiom of...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimension_(vector_space)

Dimension

Di·men'sion noun [ Latin dimensio , from dimensus , past participle of dimetiri to measure out; di- = dis- + metiri to measure: confer French dimension . See Measure .] 1. Measure in a single line, as length, breadth, height, thickness, or ci...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/67

dimension

1. Measure in a single line, as length, breadth, height, thickness, or circumference; extension; measurement; usually, in the plural, measure in length and breadth, or in length, breadth, and thickness; extent; size; as, the dimensions of a room, or of a ship; the dimensions of a farm, of a kingdom. 'Gentlemen of more than ordinary dimensions.' (W....
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Dimension

1. Of a set: the dimension of the smallest affine space that contains the set. The dimension of an affine space is k if the maximum number of affinely independent points in the set is k+1. Of particular interest is the column space of a matrix A: {x: x=Ay for some y in R^n}. The dimension of this is the rank of A. Another is the row space of A: {x:...
Found on http://glossary.computing.society.informs.org/index.php?page=D.html

dimension

A measure in one direction; the length, width, or height of a figure
Found on http://www.hbschool.com/glossary/math2/index6.html

dimension

An extension in some unique direction or sense; the word comes from the Latin for 'measured out.' The most common way to think of a dimension is as one of the three spatial dimensions in which we live. Mathematicians and science fiction writers alike have long imagined what it would be like in a wor...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/D/dimension.html

dimension

dimension, in mathematics, number of parameters or coordinates required locally to describe points in a mathematical object (usually geometric in character). For example, the space we inhabit is three-dimensional, a plane or surface is two-dimensional, a line or curve is one-dimensional, and a point...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0815531.html

dimension

dimension, in physics, an expression of the character of a derived quantity in relation to fundamental quantities, without regard for its numerical value. In any system of measurement, such as the metric system, certain quantities are considered fundamental, and all others are considered to be deriv...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0815532.html

Dimension

Giving hair more than one color gives it natural dimension.
Found on https://www.loxabeauty.com/thelayer/hair-color-glossary-terms-you-need-to-k

dimension

in common parlance, the measure of the size of an object, such as a box, usually given as length, width, and height. In mathematics, the notion of ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/50

dimension

In science, any directly measurable physical quantity such as mass (M), length (L), and time (T), and the derived units obtainable by multiplication or division from such quantities. For example, acceleration (the rate of change of velocity) has dimensions (LT-2), and is expressed in such units as km s-2
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0028953.html

dimension

Sawn - The nominal dimension of the board plus the overcut to allow for shrinkage. Nominal - The general intended size of the dry rough sawn board. Machined - The actual size of a machined or moulded board
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21113

Dimension

Stone-Natural building stone that has been selected, trimmed, or cut to specified shapes and sizes. Final surface treatment, or finish is as specified.
Found on http://www.selectstone.com/architectural-resources/stone-glossary/

Dimension

To annotate a drawing or PCB with sizes, distances between critical positions (e.g. mounting holes), radii of profiling, drilled hole sizes, etc
Found on http://www.vutrax.co.uk/glossary.htm

dimension

Type: Term Pronunciation: di-men′shŭn Definitions: 1. Scope, size, magnitude; denoting, in the plural, linear measurements of length, width, and height.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=24929
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