Dielectric

any material that is electrically insulating.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20089

Dielectric

An insulating (non-conductive) material usually when used in a capacitor or specific insulating situation such as in a coaxial cable.
Found on http://www.zoo.co.uk/~z0001325/Glossary.html

Dielectric

A material which acts as an electrical insulator.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20510

Dielectric

An insulating material. Such as the material between theplates of a capacitor. See also: Dielectric Constant, Dielectric Displacement, Dielectric Losses, Dielectric Strength, Ferroelectric.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/d/i/dielectric/source.html

Dielectric

any material that is electrically insulating.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/538-Dielectric

Dielectric

Material that does not conduct electricity. Generally used for making capacitors, insulating conductors (as in crossover and multilayered circuits) and for encapsulating circuits.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20827

Dielectric

A nonconductor of electricity, such as an insulator, or a substance in which an electric field can be maintained with a minimum loss of power. The material used between two conducting plates to form a capacitor.
Found on http://www.mpoweruk.com/glossary.htm

dielectric

An insulating medium which occupies the region between two conductors.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20870

Dielectric

Nonconductor of electricity; the ability of a material to resist the flow of an electric current.
Found on http://www.komprex.com/Glossary/index.htm

Dielectric

The insulating material that separates the centre conductor and the shielding.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20957

Dielectric

Di`e·lec'tric noun [ Prefix dia- + electric .] (Electricity) Any substance or medium that transmits the electric force by a process different from conduction, as in the phenomena of induction; a nonconductor. separating a body electrified by induction, from the electrifying body.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/62

dielectric

<physics> Any substance or medium that transmits the electric force by a process different from conduction, as in the phenomena of induction; a nonconductor. Separating a body electrified by induction, from the electrifying body. ... Origin: Pref. Dia- + electric. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

dielectric

(di″ә-lek´trik) transmitting electric effects by induction, but not by conduction. The term is applied to an insulating substance through or across which electric force is acting or may act, by induction without conduction. an insulating substance that transmits in this way, through or across w...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Dielectric

• (n.) Any substance or medium that transmits the electric force by a process different from conduction, as in the phenomena of induction; a nonconductor. separating a body electrified by induction, from the electrifying body.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/dielectric/

dielectric

insulating material or a very poor conductor of electric current. When dielectrics are placed in an electric field, practically no current flows in ... [7 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/46

Dielectric

1) Any electrical insulating medium between two conductors. 2) The medium used to provide electrical isolation or separation.
Found on http://www.youngco.com/young2.asp?ID=4&Type=3

dielectric

qualifies a substance which can be polarized by an electric field
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=121-12-09

dielectric

a substance whose basic electromagnetic property is to be polarized by an electric field NOTE - In practice insulating materials are often called dielectrics when permittivity is an important property concerned in use.
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=212-01-04

dielectric

A nonconductor of electric charge in which an applied electric field causes a displacement of charge but not a flow of charge. Electrons within the atoms of a dielectric are, on average, displaced by an applied field with respect to the nucleus, giving rise to a dipole that has an electric moment in...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/D/dielectric.html

dielectric

dielectric (dī"ilek'trik) , material that does not conduct electricity readily, i.e., an insulator (see insulation). A good dielectric should also have other properties: It must resist breakdown under high voltages; it should not itself draw appreciable power from the circuit; it must ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0815473.html

Dielectric

Dielectric is the name given to any medium through or across which electrostatic induction can take place. The application of an electric field to a dielectric results only in a displacement of electric charge within the material, due to the molecules becoming polarized and orientating themselves in the direction of the electric field. Faraday firs...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GD.HTM

Dielectric

A dielectric material (dielectric for short) is an electrical insulator that can be polarized by an applied electric field. When a dielectric is placed in an electric field, electric charges do not flow through the material as they do in a conductor, but only slightly shift from their average equilibrium positions causing dielectric polarization. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dielectric
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