dialect

[n] - the usage or vocabulary that is characteristic of a specific group of people
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=dialect

Dialect

a form of speech peculiar to a district, class, or person
Found on http://www.mantex.co.uk/samples/eng.htm

Dialect

Dialect refers to which particular words are chosen, which can either be from the vocabulary (i.e. lexicon) of the Standard English dialect or from, for example, a vocabulary of a specific regional area for example, the word 'bread roll' has a number of different names in different parts of the country such as 'cob', 'bap'.…
Found on http://www.englishbiz.co.uk/grammar/main_files/definitionsa-m.htm

dialect

variety of speech differing from the standard or literary language and characterised by local vocabulary, constructions or pronunciations
Found on http://www.bl.uk/learning/langlit/sounds/find-out-more/glossary/

Dialect

A dialect is a variety of a language used in a particular area and which is distinguished by certain features of grammar or vocabulary. Examples of such features in some English dialects are: non-standard subject + verb patterns, eg I knows, you was, he like past tense forms, eg I done, I seen various individual words and expressions, eg owt/nowt ...
Found on http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/63285/nls_fw

Dialect

Di'a·lect noun [ French dialecte , Latin dialectus , from Greek ..., from ... to converse, discourse. See Dialogue .] 1. Means or mode of expressing thoughts; language; tongue; form of speech. « This book is writ in such a dialect As may the minds of listless...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/57

dialect

1. Means or mode of expressing thoughts; language; tongue; form of speech. 'This book is writ in such a dialect As may the minds of listless men affect. Bunyan. The universal dialect of the world.' (South) ... 2. The form of speech of a limited region or people, as distinguished from ether forms nearly related to it; a variety or subdivision of a l...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

dialect

idiom noun the usage or vocabulary that is characteristic of a specific group of people; `the immigrants spoke an odd dialect of English`; `he has a strong German accent`; `it has been said that a language is a dialect with an army and navy`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=dialect

Dialect

• (n.) The form of speech of a limited region or people, as distinguished from ether forms nearly related to it; a variety or subdivision of a language; speech characterized by local peculiarities or specific circumstances; as, the Ionic and Attic were dialects of Greece; the Yorkshire dialect; the dialect of the learned. • (n.) Means or ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/dialect/

dialect

a variety of a language. The word comes from the Ancient Greek dialektos `discourse, language, dialect,` which is derived from dialegesthai `to ... [15 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/42

dialect

dialect 1. Manner of speaking, language, speech; especially a manner of speech peculiar to, or characteristic of, a particular person or class; phraseology, idiom. 2. One of the subordinate forms or varieties of a language arising from local peculiarities of vocabulary, pronunciation, and idiom. 3. Any form of speech considered a deviation from re...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2526/

dialect

dialect, variety of a language used by a group of speakers within a particular speech community. Every individual speaks a variety of his language, termed an idiolect. Dialects are groups of idiolects with a common core of similarities in pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary. Dialects exist as a c...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0815400.html

dialect

Variation of a spoken language shared by those in a particular area or a particular social or ethnic group. The term is used to indicate a geographical area (`northern dialects` or `Brooklyn dialect`) or social or ethnic group (`African-American dialect`). Geographically, dialects are the result of settlement histo...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0005985.html

Dialect

[computing] A dialect of a programming language is a (relatively small) variation or extension of the language that does not change its intrinsic nature. With languages such as Scheme and Forth, standards may be considered insufficient, inadequate or even illegitimate by implementors, so often they will deviate from the standard, making a n...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dialect_(computing)

Dialect

The term dialect (from the ancient Greek word διάλεκτος diálektos, `discourse`, from διά diá, `through` and λέγω legō, `I speak`) is used in two distinct ways. One usage—the more common among linguists—refers to a variety of a language that is a characteristic of a particular group of the language`s speakers. The term...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dialect

Dialect

The language of a particular district, class, or group of persons. The term dialect encompasses the
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Dialect

a regional variety of a language; Central
Found on http://www.africanculturalcenter.org/10_0glossary.html
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