Decay

A process in which a particle disappears and in its place different particles appear. The sum of the masses of the produced particles is always less than the mass of the original particle.

decay

  1. the process of gradually becoming inferior
  2. a gradual decrease; as of stored charge or current
  3. the organic phenomenon of rotting
  4. the spontaneous disintegration of a radioactive substance along with the emission of ionizing radiation

Decay

Damage of internal living tissues in a tree caused by fungi which affects its strength and stability.
Found on http://www.wilbytree.co.uk/glossary.html

Decay

Disintegration of wood or other substance through the action of fungi.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

decay

(de-ka´) the gradual decomposition of dead organic matter. the process or stage of decline, as in old age. tooth decay dental caries.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

decay

(dynamic) When the incremental increase or decrease of virtual resources or elements affects other gameplay elements, features, or challenges.
Found on http://critical-gaming.com/critical-glossary/

decay

[n] - an inferior state resulting from the process of decaying 2. [n] - the spontaneous disintegration of a radioactive substance along with the emission of ionizing radiation 3. [n] - the process of gradually becoming inferior 4. [n] - a gradual decrease 5. [n] - the organic phenomenon of rotting 6. [v] - undergo decay o...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=decay

Decay

• (n.) Cause of decay. • (v. t.) To destroy. • (v. t.) To cause to decay; to impair. • (n.) Gradual failure of health, strength, soundness, prosperity, or of any species of excellence or perfection; tendency toward dissolution or extinction; corruption; rottenness; decline; deterioration; as, the decay of the body; the decay of ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/decay/

decay

noun the spontaneous disintegration of a radioactive substance along with the emission of ionizing radiation
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=decay

decay

decomposition noun the organic phenomenon of rotting
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=decay

Decay

[Sevendust song] `Decay` is the official first single from the ninth studio album, Black Out the Sun by American alternative metal band Sevendust which was released on January 29, 2013. ==Recording and production== The song was recorded at Architekt Music studios in Butler, New Jersey with engineer Mike Ferretti. `We were starting to get bu...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decay_(Sevendust_song)

Decay

De·cay' intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Decayed ; present participle & verbal noun Decaying .] [ Old French decaeir , dechaer , decheoir , French déchoir , to decline, fall, become less; Lat...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/14

Decay

De·cay' noun 1. Gradual failure of health, strength, soundness, prosperity, or of any species of excellence or perfection; tendency toward dissolution or extinction; corruption; rottenness; decline; deterioration; as, the decay of the body; the decay of virtue; the decay o...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/14

Decay

De·cay' transitive verb 1. To cause to decay; to impair. [ R.] « Infirmity, that decays the wise.» Shak. 2. To destroy. [ Obsolete] Shak.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/14

Decay

1. Used both for acoustical and electronic sound sources. The characteristic fall-off in output amplitude or volume a sound producing source emits when the force creating the vibrations (or the current powering the oscillator in a synthesizer, for instance) is removed. This term is often confused with release, the fourth section of a sound's envelo...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22286

decay

a decrease in stored information not caused by erasing or writing
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=531-43-19

Decay

A loss in the clarity or readability of an electronic signal caused bythe interaction of the signal with its carrier and electrical environment.
Found on http://www.wildpackets.com/resources/compendium/glossary_of_networking_term

Decay

A transformation in which an atom, nucleus, or subatomic particle changes into two or more objects whose total rest energy is less than the rest energy of the original object.
Found on http://www-bdnew.fnal.gov/operations/accgloss/gloss.html

Decay

Also known as Radioactive Decay . Radioactive substances undergo radioactive decay, the rate of which is determined by the properties of the radionuclide. As decay proceeds the resulting activity of the parent Nuclide reduces and will eventually disappear. The daughter product may be stable (inactive) or may itself be Radioactive and undergo furth....
Found on http://www.ionactive.co.uk/glossary_atoz.html?s=az&t=d

Decay

Also known as Radioactive Decay . Radioactive substances undergo radioactive decay, the rate of which is determined by the properties of the radionuclide. As decay proceeds the resulting activity of the parent Nuclide reduces and will eventually disappear. The daughter product may be stable (inactive) or may itself be Radioactive and undergo furthe...
Found on http://www.ionactive.co.uk/glossary.html

Decay

Any process in which a particle disappears and in its place two or more different particles appear.
Found on http://www2.slac.stanford.edu/vvc/glossary.html

Decay

Change of an element into a different element, usually with some other particle(s) and energy emitted.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/608-Decay

decay

Change of an element into a different element, usually with some other particle(s) and energy emitted.
Found on http://www.shodor.org/UNChem/glossary.html

Decay

Damage of internal living tissues in a tree caused by fungi which affects its strength and stability.
Found on http://www.treesurgeonsmanchester.com/page/glossary_of_terms

Decay

Damage of internal living tissues in a tree caused by fungi which affects its strength and stability.
Found on http://www.wilbytree.co.uk/glossary.html
No exact match found