Concrete

A mixture of cement aggregates and water. In each cubic metre of concrete there will be between 150 and 450kg of cement, approximately 800kg of fine aggregate, 1200kg of coarse aggregate and 180kg of water, with all weights varying depending on the strength and consistency required from the mix.

concrete

Concrete was especially useful when the Empire was threatened with attack because it made it easy to build strong fortifications at speed. Like so many of the innovations that the invaders brought with them, concrete was not strictly a Roman invention. The first mortared walls seem to have been built in Campania, the area in southern Italia settled…...

Concrete

[student newspaper] Concrete is the University of East Anglia`s student newspaper. With a circulation of up to 5,000, Concrete is free and published fortnightly on a Tuesday, during term time. The newspaper celebrated its 250th issue in January 2011. Concrete is compiled by a team of around 25 section editors and headed by the editor-in-chi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concrete_(student_newspaper)

Concrete

Concrete is a composition used in building, consisting of hydraulic or other mortar mixed with gravel or stone chippings about the size of a nut. It is used extensively in building, particularly under water, for example, to form the bottom of a canal or sluice, or the foundation of any structures raised in the sea; and it is also frequently used to...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TC.HTM

Concrete

a composite material consisting of aggregate particles bound together in a solid body by a cement.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20089

concrete

[adj] - formed by the coalescence of particles 2. [adj] - capable of being perceived by the senses 3. [n] - a strong hard building material composed of sand and gravel and cement and water 4. [v] - cover with cement 5. [v] - form into a solid mass
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=concrete

Concrete

Building material made from cement, sand, stone and water.DiscoveredRomans first use concrete around 200BC.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/c/o/concrete/source.html

concrete

Building material composed of cement, stone, sand, and water. It has been used since Roman times. Since the late 19th century, it has been increasingly employed as an economical alternative to...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Concrete

Structural material comprising a mixture of fine aggregate, coarse aggregate, cement and water.
Found on http://www.corusconstruction.com/en/design_guidance/the_blue_book/

Concrete

a composite material consisting of aggregate particles bound together in a solid body by a cement.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/324-Concrete

Concrete

A mixture of Portland cement, sand, gravel and water. Lime may be used in place of the cement, in which case the mixture is known as lime concrete. If rods of steel are embedded in the concrete it is reinforced concrete. It these are put under tension while the concrete is setting, it is pre-stressed concrete. Reinforced concrete made in a mould to...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20938

Concrete

Con'crete adjective [ Latin concretus , past participle of concrescere to grow together; con- + crescere to grow; confer French concret . See Crescent .] 1. United in growth; hence, formed by coalition of separate particles into one mass; united in a ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/129

Concrete

Con'crete noun 1. A compound or mass formed by concretion, spontaneous union, or coalescence of separate particles of matter in one body. « To divide all concretes , minerals and others, into the same number of distinct substances. Boyle. » 2. A mixture of g...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/129

Concrete

Con·crete' intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Concreted ; p. pr & verbal noun Concreting .] To unite or coalesce, as separate particles, into a mass or solid body. » Applied to some substances, it is equivalent to i...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/129

Concrete

Con·crete' transitive verb 1. To form into a mass, as by the cohesion or coalescence of separate particles. « There are in our inferior world divers bodies that are concreted out of others. Sir M. Hale. » 2. To cover with, or form of, concrete, as a pavemen...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/129

concrete

Solid, tangible. ... Origin: L. Concretus ... (18 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

concrete

adjective formed by the coalescence of particles
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=concrete

concrete

adjective capable of being perceived by the senses; not abstract or imaginary; `concrete objects such as trees`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=concrete

concrete

noun a strong hard building material composed of sand and gravel and cement and water
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=concrete

concrete

verb form into a solid mass; coalesce
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=concrete

concrete

verb cover with cement; `concrete the walls`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=concrete

Concrete

• (v. t.) To cover with, or form of, concrete, as a pavement. • (a.) Standing for an object as it exists in nature, invested with all its qualities, as distinguished from standing for an attribute of an object; -- opposed to abstract. • (n.) A mixture of gravel, pebbles, or broken stone with cement or with tar, etc., used for sidewal...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/concrete/

concrete

(from the article `perfume`) ...Certain delicate oils may be obtained by solvent extraction, a process also employed to extract waxes and perfume oil, yielding—by removal of the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/125

concrete

in construction, structural material consisting of a hard, chemically inert particulate substance, known as aggregate (usually sand and gravel), ... [26 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/125

concrete

in philosophy, such entities as persons, physical objects, and events (or the terms or names that denote such things), as contrasted with such ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/125
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