collegium

(from the article `college`) In Roman law a collegium was a body of persons associated for a common function. The name was used by many medieval institutions—from guilds to the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/109

Collegium

[ancient Rome] In Ancient Rome, a collegium (plural collegia, `joined by law`) was any association with a legal personality. Such associations had various functions. ==Functioning== Collegia could function as guilds, social clubs, or burial societies; in practice, in ancient Rome, they sometimes became organized bodies of local businessmen ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collegium_(ancient_Rome)

Collegium

[school] A collegium is a French form of schooling that is both a secondary school and a college. ==Information== They are uncommon today. Most collegiums in the United States were built by Roman Catholic religious institutes. One example is the College of the Immaculate Conception in New Orleans, established by the Society of Jesus (Jesuit...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collegium_(school)
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