cena

The Romans could eat 3 meals a day. The first 2 meals of the day would be very light for the majority of people, from everyday citizens to the richer. Dinner (cena) was the main meal of the day. The very poor might be glad to enjoy just this one meal each day. During the Republic and perhaps through the 2nd century BC, the Romans ate mostly vegetab…...

Cena

(Spanish) dinner - evening meal

cena

Latin, meaning: dinner, meal.
Found on http://archives.nd.edu/ccc.htm

Cena

(Latin) for the Romans, it means dinner; the meal usually began around 4 PM and consisted of three parts, 1) gustatio, 2) fercula or mensae primae, and 3) mensae secundae; the gustatio started with olives, some type of small fish, and a salad; the fercula or mensae primae, main course, usually consisted of three components: fish, roasted meat, and ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/10135

Cena

In Ancient Roman culture, cena was the main meal of the day. In earlier times, it was held midday, but later began to be held in evenings. It was a focal point of social life, along with the public baths, the frequenting of which often preceded the meal. Seating during dinner was arranged in the triclinium, three couches for reclining arranged as ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cena
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