Cause

(Lat. causa) Anything responsible for change, motion or action. In the history of philosophy numerous interpretations were given to the term. Aristotle distinguished among the material cause, or that out of which something arises, the formal cause, that is, the pattern or essence determining the creation of a thing, the efficient cause, or the fo.....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/c.html

Cause

(n) Cause is the reason, ground , basis with which an event , activity is occurred by having direct and influential effect on the occurrence of the event. A casual connection cannot be treated as the cause. Eg. The cause of an accident is the engine defect but not the function to which the passenger is heading to
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

cause

[n] - events that provide the generative force that is the origin of something 2. [n] - a justification for something existing or happening 3. [v] - give rise to
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=cause

Cause

• (v.) Sake; interest; advantage. • (v.) A suit or action in court; any legal process by which a party endeavors to obtain his claim, or what he regards as his right; case; ground of action. • (v.) That which is the occasion of an action or state; ground; reason; motive; as, cause for rejoicing. • (v.) That which produces or eff...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/cause/

cause

noun a series of actions advancing a principle or tending toward a particular end; `he supported populist campaigns`; `they worked in the cause of world peace`; `the team was ready for a drive toward the pennant`; `the movement to end slavery`; `contributed to...
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=cause

cause

reason noun a justification for something existing or happening; `he had no cause to complain`; `they had good reason to rejoice`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=cause

Cause

Cause (kaz) noun [ French cause , from Latin causa . Confer Cause , v. , Kickshaw .] 1. That which produces or effects a result; that from which anything proceeds, and without which it would not exist. « Cause is substance exer...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/39

Cause

Cause conj. Abbreviation of Because . B. Jonson.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/39

Cause

Cause intransitive verb To assign or show cause; to give a reason; to make excuse. [ Obsolete] Spenser.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/39

Cause

Cause transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Caused ; present participle & v. noun Causing .] [ French causer , from cause , from Latin causa . See Cause , noun , and confer
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/39

Cause

1) To make something happen. 2) The reason something happens. In order to hold someone responsible for harm to another person, the one must have caused the injury to the other.
Found on http://www.nolo.com/dictionary/cause-term.html

Cause

A cause is that which produces an effect; that from which anything proceeds and without which it would not exist. In the system of Aristotle the word rendered by cause and its equivalents in modern language has a more extensive signification. He divides causes into four kinds: efficient, formal, material, and final. The efficient or first cause is ...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AC.HTM

Cause

A lawsuit, litigation, or action. Any question, civil or criminal, litigated or contested before a court of justice.
Found on http://jec.unm.edu/manuals-resources/glossary-of-legal-terms

Cause

A reason or explanation for a problem or illness based on analysis investigation.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21465

Cause

An advocacy group or online campaign for collective action. Any Facebook user can start one. A cause can be used to raise money or promote one
Found on http://webgoals.co/facebook-glossary/

Cause

Civ. Law. This word has two meanings. 1. It signifies the delivery of the thing, or the accomplishment of the act which is the object of a convention. 2. It is the consideration or motive for making a contract. An obligation without a cause, or with a false or unlawful cause, has no effect; but an engagement is not the less valid, though the cause ...
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def/c216.htm

cause

from Latin causa 1) v. to make something happen. 2) n. the reason something happens. A cause implies what is called a "causal connection" as distinguished from events which may occur but do not have any effect on later events. Example: While driving his convertible, Johnny Youngblood begins to stare at pretty Sally Golightly, who is standing on the...
Found on http://dictionary.law.com/Default.xhtml?selected=155

cause

Lawsuit, litigation or action. Any question, civil or criminal, litigated or contested before a court of justice.
Found on http://www.pacourts.us/learn/legal-glossary

cause

That which produces an effect or condition; that by which a morbid change or disease is brought about. ... Origin: L. Causa ... (05 Mar 2000) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Cause

The principle from which the existence of a thing proceeds and upon which it depends; a principle that directly instigates a change in something. As with the term “being,” there are varied categories of causality. The primary sense, here given, is that of an efficient or active cause; the agent.
Found on http://catholicism.org/phil-glossary.html

cause

Type: Term Pronunciation: kawz Definitions: 1. That which produces an effect or condition; that by which a morbid change or disease is brought about.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=15181

Cause

When there is evidence to link a factor and an outcome, and we can explain how it happens, we can say that the factor causes the outcome, e.g. smoking causes cancer
Found on http://www.makingsenseofhealth.org.uk/default.html?section=Secondary&chapte
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