Blockade

A blockade is an effort to cut off food, supplies, war material or communications from a particular area by force, either in part or totally. A blockade should not be confused with an embargo or sanctions, which are legal barriers to trade, and is distinct from a siege in that a blockade is usually directed at an entire country or region, rather t...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blockade

blockade

(blok-ād´) in pharmacology, the blocking of the effect of a neurotransmitter or hormone by a drug. in histochemistry, a chemical reaction that modifies certain chemical groups and blocks a specific staining method. regional anesthesia.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

blockade

[n] - prevents access or progress 2. [n] - a war measure that isolates some area of importance to the enemy 3. [v] - obstruct access to 4. [v] - impose a blockade on
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=blockade

Blockade

• (v. t.) An obstruction to passage. • (n.) Hence, to shut in so as to prevent egress. • (n.) To obstruct entrance to or egress from. • (v. t. ) To shut up, as a town or fortress, by investing it with troops or vessels or war for the purpose of preventing ingress or egress, or the introduction of supplies. See note under Blockad...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/blockade/

blockade

verb obstruct access to
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

blockade

encirclement noun a war measure that isolates some area of importance to the enemy
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Blockade

[board game] Blockade is a `the Beat the Barrier` board game for two players, invented by Mirko Marchesi and published by Lakeside{dn|date=September 2013} in 1975. The newer strategy game Quoridor shares many of the same characteristics as Blockade. ==Gameplay and rules== Two players are each given two pawns, nine green walls (which are pla...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blockade_(board_game)

Blockade

[solitaire] Blockade is a solitaire card game which uses two decks of 52 playing cards each. Akin to solitaire games like Klondike and Gargantua, the object of the game is play the cards into the eight foundations. ==Rules== The game starts with twelve piles, each containing a card (the rest form the stock). Cards are built down by suit (e....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blockade_(solitaire)

Blockade

[video game] Blockade is an arcade maze game developed and published by Gremlin in October 1976. Using four directional buttons, each player moves their character around leaving a solid line behind them, turning at 90 degree angles. To win, a player must last longer than the opponent before hitting something, with the first person to hit so...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blockade_(video_game)

Blockade

Block·ade' noun [ Confer Italian bloccata . See Block , transitive verb ] 1. The shutting up of a place by troops or ships, with the purpose of preventing ingress or egress, or the reception of supplies; as, the blockade of the ports of an enemy. &#...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/67

Blockade

Block·ade' transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Blockaded ; present participle & verbal noun Blockading .] 1. To shut up, as a town or fortress, by investing it with troops or vessels or war for the purpose of preventing...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/67

blockade

1. Intravenous injection of large amounts of colloidal dyes or other substances whereby the reaction of the reticuloendothelial cells to other influences (e.g., by phagocytosis) is temporarily prevented. ... 2. Arrest of peripheral nerve conduction or transmission at autonomic synaptic junctions, autonomic receptor sites, or myoneural junctions by ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Blockade

A blockade is the rendering of intercourse with the seaports of an enemy unlawful on the part of neutrals, and it consists essentially in the presence of a sufficient naval force to make such intercourse difficult. It must be declared or made public, so that neutrals may have notice of it. If a blockade is instituted by a sufficient authority, and ...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AB.HTM

blockade

an act of war by which a belligerent prevents access to or departure from a defined part of the enemy`s coasts.[6 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/79

blockade

blockade, use of naval forces to cut off maritime communication and supply. Blockades may be used to prevent shipping from reaching enemy ports, or they may serve purposes of coercion. The term is rarely applied to land sieges. During the Napoleonic wars, both France and Great Britain attempted to c...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/history/A0807921.html

blockade

Cutting-off of a place by hostile forces by land, sea, or air so as to prevent any movement to or fro, in order to compel a surrender without attack or to achieve some other political aim (for...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

blockade

Cutting-off of a place by hostile forces by land, sea, or air so as to prevent any movement to or fro, in order to compel a surrender without attack or to achieve some other political aim (for example, the Berlin blockade (1948) and Union blockade of Confederate ports during the American Civil War). Economic sanctions are sometimes used in an a...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0029537.html

blockade

stopping people or goods (such as ammunition) getting through
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20771

Blockade

The actual investment of a port or place by a hostile force fully competent to cut off all communication therewith, so arranged or disposed as to be able to apply its force to every point of practicable access or approach to the port or place so invested.
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def/b107.htm

blockade

Type: Term Pronunciation: blok-ād′ Definitions: 1. The occupation of receptors by an antagonist so that usual agonists are relatively ineffective. 2. Receptor blockade, blocking the effect of a hormone at the cell surface. 3. Arrest of nerve impulse conduction or transmission at autonomic synaptic junctions, autonomic receptor sites, or ...
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=10795
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