Beat

The basic unit of musical time. Beats are normally grouped together into regular groups called bars, and depending on how beats are accented different characteristic rhythms will result.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio2/soldonsong/glossary/b.shtml

Beat

The rhythmic or musical quality of a poem. In metrical verse, this is determined by the regular pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables. However, free verse often features a beat e.g. the work of Walt Whitman. Beat is one of the main things distinguishing poetry from prose.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

beat

[n] - a single pulsation of an oscillation produced by adding two waves of different frequencies 2. [n] - a regular route for a sentry or policeman 3. [n] - the sound of stroke or blow 4. [n] - a regular rate of repetition 5. [n] - a stroke or blow 6. [n] - the act of beating to windward 7. [v] - be superior 8. [v]
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=beat

Beat

1) The steady even pulse in music.
2) The action of two sounds or audio signals mixing together and causing regular rises &.falls in volume.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

Beat

The ‘tick` of a clock or watch, produced as a pallet comes into contact with the escape-wheel.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20450

Beat

crisp striking movement of the opponent's blade creating a deflection, or obtaining a reaction; used as a preparation
Found on http://www.britishfencing.com/British_Fencing.html?PageID=118

Beat

an attempt to knock the opponent's blade aside or out of line by using one's foible or middle against the opponent's foible
Found on http://www.hpfc.org.uk/glossary.htm

Beat

Beat (bēt) transitive verb [ imperfect Beat ; past participle Beat , Beaten ; present participle & verbal noun Beating .] [ Middle English beaten , beten , Anglo-Saxon be...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/26

Beat

Beat intransitive verb 1. To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly. « The men of the city . . . beat at the door. Judges. xix. 22. » 2. To move with pulsation or throbbing. « A thousand hearts beat happily...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/26

Beat

Beat noun 1. A stroke; a blow. « He, with a careless beat , Struck out the mute creation at a heat. Dryden. » 2. A recurring stroke; a throb; a pulsation; as, a beat of the heart; the beat of the pulse. 3. (Mus.) (a) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/26

Beat

Beat adjective Weary; tired; fatigued; exhausted. [ Colloq.] « Quite beat , and very much vexed and disappointed. Dickens. »
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/26

beat

1. To strike repeatedly; to lay repeated blows upon; as, to beat one's breast; to beat iron so as to shape it; to beat grain, in order to force out the seeds; to beat eggs and sugar; to beat a drum. 'Thou shalt beat some of it [spices] very small.' (Ex. Xxx. 36) 'They did beat the gold into thin plates.' (Ex. Xxxix. 3) ... 2. To punish by blows; to...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

beat

noun a regular rate of repetition; `the cox raised the beat`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=beat

beat

verb give a beating to; subject to a beating, either as a punishment or as an act of aggression; `Thugs beat him up when he walked down the street late at night`; `The teacher used to beat the students`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=beat

beat

(bēt) a throb or pulsation, as of the heart or of an artery.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Beat

• (v. i.) A round or course which is frequently gone over; as, a watchman`s beat. • (v. t.) To overcome in a battle, contest, strife, race, game, etc.; to vanquish or conquer; to surpass. • (v. t.) To tread, as a path. • (n.) A transient grace note, struck immediately before the one it is intended to ornament. • (a.) Weary;...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/beat/

beat

in music, the basic rhythmic unit of a measure, or bar, not to be confused with rhythm as such; nor is the beat necessarily identical with the ... [4 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/36

beat

in physics, the pulsation caused by the combination of two waves of slightly different frequencies. The principle of beats for sound waves can be ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/36

Beat

Beat is slang for to puzzle or baffle.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZB.HTM

Beat

[police] In police terminology, a beat is the territory and time that a police officer patrols. Beat policing is based on traditional policing (late 19th century) and utilises the close relationship with the community members within the assigned Beat to strengthen police effectiveness and encourage cooperative efforts to make a safer commun...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beat_(police)

Beat

In music the beat is the beating or pulsation resulting from the joint vibrations of two sounds of the same strength, and all but in unison. The term is also applied to a short shake or transient grace-note struck immediately before the note it is intended to ornament.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VB.HTM

Beat

To agitate an ingredient or combination of ingredients vigorously, using a spoon, whisk, electric mixer or fork. Beating can be used as a method to soften and blend ingredients or to incorporate air into a mixture.
Found on http://www.wrenscottage.com/kitchen/glossary.php

beat

Type: Term Pronunciation: bēt Definitions: 1. To strike; to throb or pulsate. 2. A stroke, impulse, or pulsation, as of the heart or pulse. 3. Activity of a cardiac chamber produced by catching a stimulus generated elsewhere in the heart. 4. The perception of a third tone when two tones of slightly different frequencies are presented. 5. One o...
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=9801

Beat

Briskly whipping or stirring it with a spoon, fork, wire whisk, beater or mixer.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21216

Beat

a pause; to take a break for the purposes of comic timing.
Found on http://www.comicalmanagement.com/pages/comical-terminology
No exact match found