bathos

  1. triteness or triviality of style
  2. insincere pathos
  3. a change from a serious subject to a disappointing one

Bathos

The descent from the sublime to the ridiculous. This expression comes from Pope's satire Peri Bathous, or the Art of Sinking (1727).
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

bathos

[n] - triteness or triviality of style
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=bathos

Bathos

anti-climax, designed to shock or amuse. e.g. The Queen stepped graciously out of her gleaming limousine, walked up the red carpet in suitably regal style--then gave a huge yawn, bored with the day's proceedings. (The reader has been built up to expect one type of serious, ceremonial atmosphere but this anticipation is deflated with reference to th...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20629

Bathos

Ba'thos (bā'thŏs) noun [ Greek ba`qos depth, from baqy`s deep.] (Rhet.) A ludicrous descent from the elevated to the low, in writing or speech; anticlimax.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/21

bathos

noun triteness or triviality of style
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=bathos

Bathos

• (n.) A ludicrous descent from the elevated to the low, in writing or speech; anticlimax.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/bathos/

bathos

(from Greek bathys, `deep`), unsuccessful, and therefore ludicrous, attempt to portray pathos in art, i.e., to evoke pity, sympathy, or sorrow. The ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/31

bathos

bathos (Greek) Depth. Literally 'depth', but figuratively 'dull' or 'inane', generally to a ludicrous degree. The term has been misused with pathos, which is something entirely different: the Greek pathos, like the Latin passio, means 'suffering', and a pathetic work is one which depicts, or elicits, suffering. When a captious reviewer den...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/287/

bathos

Alexander Pope's Peri-Bathous, or the Art of Sinking in Poetry (1728) describes bathos as a poet's fall, in a work of some seriousness, into an unintentionally comic pathos.
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

bathos

In literary theory, sudden descent from the important and serious to the ridiculous or comic; when it occurs at the end of a passage or sequence, it is a form of anticlimax. In weak or inexperienced writers, bathos is usually unintentional
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0038668.html

Bathos

Bathos (s; Greek βάθος, meaning `depth`) is an abrupt transition in style from the exalted to the commonplace, producing a ludicrous effect. While often unintended, bathos may be used deliberately to produce a humorous effect. If bathos is overt, it may be described as Burlesque or mock-heroic. It should not be confused with pathos, a mode .....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bathos

Bathos

(Grk, 'depth') Not to be confused with pathos, bathos is a descent in literature in which a poet or
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Bathos

Alexander pope's peri-bathous, or the art of sinking in poetry (1728) describes bathos as a poet's f
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

bathos

appearance of the commonplace in elevated matter for rhetorical effect
Found on http://phrontistery.info/b.html
No exact match found