Avant-garde

The avant-garde (from French, `advance guard` or `vanguard`, literally `fore-guard`) are people or works that are experimental or innovative, particularly with respect to art, culture, and politics. The avant-garde pushes the boundaries of what is accepted as the norm or the status quo, primarily in the cultural realm. The avant-garde is con...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avant-garde

avant-garde

(from the article `United States`) ...was merely difficult. Much of the new art and dance seemed puzzling and deliberately obscure. Difficult art happened, above all, in New York City. ... Painter Gustave Courbet`s rebellious Realism was the case par excellence of new avant-gardism that threw off the centuries-old debate between ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/129

avant-garde

[adj] - radically new or original
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=avant-garde

avant-garde

daring adjective radically new or original; `an avant-garde theater piece`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=avant-garde

Avant-Garde

A group active in the invention and application of new ideas and techniques in an original or experimental way. A group of practitioners and/or advocates of a new art form may also be called avant-garde. Some avant-garde works are intended to shock those who are accustomed to traditional, established styles.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21109

AVANT-GARDE

A group active in the invention and application of new ideas and techniques in an original or experimental way. A group of practitioners and/or advocates of a new art form may also be called avant-garde. Some avant-garde works are intended to shock those who are accustomed to traditional, established styles.
Found on http://www.modernsculpture.com/glossary.htm

Avant-Garde

A new or experimental concept
Found on http://www.ifla.org/VII/s30/pub/mg1.htm#5

avant-garde

a play pushing the limits of convention. Example: 'Little Fears,' an avant-garde comic drama by Emanuel Peluso, 2m2f.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20099

avant-garde

French for advance guard" or "vanguard." Those considered the leaders (and often regarded as radicals) in the invention and application of new concepts in a given field.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21532

Avant-garde

French for vanguard. Artists and their work which stand in the forefront of new ideas, often in opposition to established ideas and traditions; art that's ahead of its time, innovative, experimental. The modern era has invariably had a flourishing avant-garde, but many have said it is no longer possible in a postmodern era. The bourgeoisie, onc...
Found on http://www.latinart.com/glossary.cfm?sort=A

Avant-Garde

French term meaning at the forefront. Art which is innovative and producing new ideas and subject matter. First appeared in France during nineteenth century and is usually credited to Henri de Saint-Simon. He believed in the social power of the arts and regarded artists, alongside scientists and industrialists, as the leaders of a new society.
Found on http://www.redraggallery.co.uk/art-glossary.html

avant-garde

In the arts, those artists or works that are in the forefront of new developments in their media. The term was introduced (as was `reactionary`) after the French Revolution, when it was used to describe any socialist political movement
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0021677.html

Avant-garde

Originally a French term, meaning in English, vanguard or advance guard (the part of an army that goes forward ahead of the rest). Applied to art, means that which is in the forefront, is innovatory, which introduces and explores new forms and in some cases new subject matter. In this sense the term first appeared in France in the first half of the...
Found on http://www.tate.org.uk/collections/glossary/definition.jsp?entryId=38
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