Assimilation

(Humans as organisms) the incorporation of the products of digestion into the body, where they are used to provide energy or for growth and repair of tissues

assimilation

(ә-sim″ĭ-la´shәn) psychologically, absorption of new experiences into the existing personality. Called also integration. anabolism. the process by which members of a culture change their lifeways in order to become totally integrated into another culture.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Assimilation

(1) Absorption and creation of food resources.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/a.html

assimilation

(from the article `cognition`) The second approach is based on the work of Swiss psychologist Jean Piaget, who viewed cognitive adaptation in terms of two basic processes: ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/114

assimilation

(from the article `human behaviour`) ...Children often possess knowledge that they do not use even when the occasion calls for it. Adapting to new challenges, according to Piaget, ... ...makes generalizations—much as a scientist does. Intellectual development, he argued, derives from two cognitive processes that work in somewhat .....
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/114

assimilation

(from the article `igneous rock`) Another method of creating different daughter magmas from a parent is by having the latter react with its wall rocks. Consider a magma that is ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/114

assimilation

(from the article `Korean language`) The spoken syllables are fairly simple in structure. Each ends either in a vowel or in one of the voiced consonants p, t, k, m, n, ng, or l. When two ... Certain common types of sound change, most notably assimilation and dissimilation, can be explained, at least partially, in terms of syntagmatic, o...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/114

assimilation

(L: ad=for/toward; similis=like; absorption) conversion of digested and absorbed food into body material; growing.
Found on http://www.seafriends.org.nz/books/glossary.htm

assimilation

[n] - the state of being assimilated 2. [n] - the social process of absorbing one cultural group into harmony with another 3. [n] - the process of absorbing nutrients into the body after digestion 4. [n] - a linguistic process by which a sound becomes similar to an adjacent sound 5. [n] - in the theories of Jean Piaget: the a...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=assimilation

Assimilation

• (n.) The conversion of nutriment into the fluid or solid substance of the body, by the processes of digestion and absorption, whether in plants or animals. • (n.) The act or process of assimilating or bringing to a resemblance, likeness, or identity; also, the state of being so assimilated; as, the assimilation of one sound to another.A...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/assimilation/

assimilation

noun in the theories of Jean Piaget: the application of a general schema to a particular instance
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=assimilation

Assimilation

[biology] Biological assimilation, or bio assimilation, is the combination of two processes to supply cells with nutrients. The first is the process of absorbing vitamins, minerals, and other chemicals from food within the gastrointestinal tract. In humans this is done with a chemical breakdown (enzymes and acids) and physical breakdown (or...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assimilation_(biology)

Assimilation

[French colonialism] Assimilation was one ideological basis of French colonial policy in the 19th and 20th centuries. In contrast with British imperial policy, the French taught their subjects that, by adopting French language and culture, they could eventually become French. The famous `Four Communes` in Senegal were seen as proof of this....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assimilation_(French_colonialism)

Assimilation

[linguistics] In linguistics, assimilation is a common phonological process by which one sound becomes more like a nearby sound. This can occur either within a word or between words. In rapid speech, for example, `handbag` is often pronounced [ˈhæmbæɡ]. As in this example, sound segments typically assimilate to a following sound (this i...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assimilation_(linguistics)

Assimilation

As·sim`i·la'tion noun [ Latin assimilatio : confer French assimilation .] 1. The act or process of assimilating or bringing to a resemblance, likeness, or identity; also, the state of being so assimilated; as, the assimilation of one sound to another. « To aspire to...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/133

assimilation

1. The act or process of assimilating or bringing to a resemblance, likeness, or identity; also, the state of being so assimilated; as, the assimilation of one sound to another. 'To aspire to an assimilation with God.' (Dr. H. More) 'The assimilation of gases and vapors.' (Sir J. Herschel) ... 2. <physiology> The conversion of nutriment into ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Assimilation

A Piagetian term describing a persons ability to comprehend and integrate new experiences.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22394

Assimilation

According to Piaget, the process whereby new cognitive elements are fitted in with old elements or modified to fit more easily; this process works in tandem with accommodation.
Found on http://www.apa.org

Assimilation

Algeo defines linguistic assimilation as 'The process by which two sounds become more alike' (313).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

assimilation

assimilation 1. The process of becoming part of, or more like, something greater. 2. The process in which one group takes on the cultural and other traits of a larger group. 3. The integration of new knowledge or information with what is already known. 4. The process of assimilating new ideas into an existing cognitive structure. 5. The incorpo...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1962/

Assimilation

First stage in the adaptation of schema, assimilation allows a child to make a general interpretation of its world. In the 'bus' example (see Organisation), once the bus schema is formed the toddler for a while calls similar vehicles buses. On being contradicted by his/her mum, and also on the basis of experience in coming across more and more type...
Found on http://www.gerardkeegan.co.uk/glossary/gloss_a.htm

assimilation

In animals, the process by which absorbed food molecules, circulating in the blood, pass into the cells and are used for growth, tissue repair, and other metabolic activities. The actual destiny of each food molecule depends not only on its type, but also on the body requirements at that time
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0029856.html

Assimilation

See below Photosynthesis .
Found on http://www.wein-plus.eu/en/Assimilation_3.0.3353.html

Assimilation

The ability of a body of water to purify itself of pollutants.
Found on http://www.epa.gov/OCEPAterms/

Assimilation

The acceptance of a minority group by a majority population, in which the group takes on the values and norms of the dominant culture.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20212
No exact match found

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