arpeggio

[n] - a chord whose notes are played in rapid succession rather than simultaneously
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=arpeggio

Arpeggio

Broken chord in which the individual tones are sounded one after another instead of simultaneously.
Found on http://www.cbso.co.uk/?page=concerts/glossary.html

Arpeggio

A succession of chord notes played one after another
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20596

Arpeggio

The notes from a chord are played in succession
Found on http://www.philharmonia.co.uk/thesoundexchange/projects/glossary/glossary.h

Arpeggio

Ar┬Ěpeg'gio noun [ Italian , from arpeggiare to play on the harp, from arpa harp.] (Mus.) The production of the tones of a chord in rapid succession, as in playing the harp, and not simultaneously; a strain thus played.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/122

arpeggio

noun a chord whose notes are played in rapid succession rather than simultaneously
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Arpeggio

• (n.) The production of the tones of a chord in rapid succession, as in playing the harp, and not simultaneously; a strain thus played.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/arpeggio/

Arpeggio

[Sly Cooper] Works by American crime writer Jeffery Deaver. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arpeggio_(Sly_Cooper)

Arpeggio

In music, arpeggio is the production of the tones of a chord in rapid succession, as in playing the harp, and not simultaneously.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VA.HTM

Arpeggio

A broken chord, usually played evenly low to high and back again.
Found on http://www.melbay.com/guitarglossary.html

arpeggio

In music, the sounding of a chord in a way that its notes are spread out and thus heard one after the other, usually from the bottom to the top. An example of arpeggios in early keyboard music can be found in Johann Sebastian Bach's Chromatic Fantasia and Fugue (1720, revised 1...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0026613.html

Arpeggio

An arpeggio (it. o) is a musical technique where notes in a chord are played or sung in sequence, one after the other, rather than ringing out simultaneously. This word comes from the Italian word `arpeggiare`, which means `to play on a harp`. An alternative translation of this term is `broken chord`. Arpeggios allow monophonic instruments t...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arpeggio

arpeggio

like a harp; i.e., the notes of the chords are to be played quickly one after another (usually ascending) instead of simultaneously. In music for piano, this is sometimes a solution in playing a wide-ranging chord whose notes cannot be played otherwise. Arpeggios are frequently used as an accompaniment. See also broken chord in this list.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_musical_terminology

arpeggio

like a harp; i.e., the notes of the chords are to be played quickly one after another (usually ascending) instead of simultaneously. Arpeggios are frequently used as an accompaniment. See also broken chord in this list.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_jazz_and_popular_music

arpeggio

like a harp; i.e., the notes of the chords are to be played quickly one after another (usually ascending) instead of simultaneously. In music for piano, this is sometimes a solution in playing a wide-ranging chord whose notes cannot be played otherwise. Arpeggios are frequently used as an accompaniment. See also broken chord in this list.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22287

arpeggio

the notes of a chord played consecutively in a consistently ascending or descending direction.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22288

Arpeggio

Broken chord in which the individual tones are sounded one after another instead of simultaneously.
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Entertainment/Music/

arpeggio

like a harp; i.e., the notes of the chords are to be played quickly one after another (usually ascending) instead of simultaneously. Arpeggios are frequently used as an accompaniment. See also broken chord in this list.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary308.php
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