agarose

A galactan polymer purified from agar that forms a rigid gel with high free water content. Primarily used as an electrophoretic support for separation of macromolecules. Stabilized derivatives are used as ‘macroporous` supports in affinity chromatography. See Sepharose.

agarose

One of the constituents of agar. Often used in preference to agar because it gels at a lower temperature and does not contain the inhibitors of virus growth frequently present in agar. It is also used widely in gel electrophoresis because it has a more uniform pore size than that of agar.
Found on http://ppathw3.cals.cornell.edu/glossary/Defs_A.htm

Agarose

a polysaccharide (structure)
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/126-Agarose

agarose

<chemical> This linear galactan is created by purifying agar, when it is heated and cooled, it forms a gel that is used as a support for many types of electrophoresis and immunodiffusion (agarbiose). A typical gel is about 1% agarose. ... Agarose is more porous than acrylamide and is sold in different grades, the lower its sulphate content, t...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

agarose

Type: Term Pronunciation: ag′ă-rōs Definitions: 1. The neutral linear polysaccharide fraction found in agar preparations, generally composed of d-galactose and altered 3,6-anhydro-l- galactose residues; used in chromatography and electrophoresis.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=1624

Agarose

An agarose is a polysaccharide polymer material, generally extracted from seaweed. Agarose is a linear polymer made up of the repeating unit of agarobiose, which is a disaccharide made up of D-galactose and 3,6-anhydro-L-galactopyranose. Agarose is one of the two principal components of agar, and is purified from agar by removing agar`s other com....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agarose
No exact match found