Affect

Attitudes and behaviour that will influence children`s progress at school and their attainment.

affect

[Verb] To influence or to cause someone or something to change.
Example: The long hours might affect her health.
See also: effective, effect
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

affect

[n] - the conscious subjective aspect of feeling or emotion 2. [v] - have an emotional or cognitive impact upon 3. [v] - have an effect upon 4. [v] - act physically on
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=affect

Affect

Feeling or emotion as distinguished from cognition, thought, or action. Affect means mood. Affective disorders are disorders of mood
Found on http://www.dwp.gov.uk/medical/med_conditions/glossary.html

Affect

Affect: The emotional tone a person expresses. A person's affect may be appropriate or inappropriate to the situation. One type of inappropriate affect is a flat affect or blunted affect, a common feature of schizophrenia.
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=26295

Affect

A person's affect is their immediate emotional state which the person can recognise subjectively and which can also be recognised objectively by others. A person's mood is their predominant current affect.
Found on http://www.priory.com/gloss.htm

Affect

Af·fect' (ăf*fĕkt') transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Affected ; present participle & verbal noun Affecting .] [ Latin affectus , past participle of afficere to affect by active agency; ad + ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/37

Affect

Af·fect' noun [ Latin affectus .] Affection; inclination; passion; feeling; disposition. [ Obsolete] Shak.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/37

Affect

Af·fect' noun (Psychotherapy) The emotional complex associated with an idea or mental state. In hysteria, the affect is sometimes entirely dissociated, sometimes transferred to another than the original idea.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/37

affect

The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

affect

noun the conscious subjective aspect of feeling or emotion
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=affect

affect

impress 1 move verb have an emotional or cognitive impact upon; `This child impressed me as unusually mature`; `This behavior struck me as odd`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=affect

affect

impact verb have an effect upon; `Will the new rules affect me?`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=affect

affect

verb act physically on; have an effect upon
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=affect

affect

regard verb connect closely and often incriminatingly; `This new ruling affects your business`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=affect

affect

(af´ekt) the external expression of emotion attached to ideas or mental representations of objects. See also mood.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Affect

• (v. t.) To act upon; to produce an effect or change upon. • (v. t.) To love; to regard with affection. • (v. t.) To influence or move, as the feelings or passions; to touch. • (v. t.) To assign; to appoint. • (v. t.) To make a show of; to put on a pretense of; to feign; to assume; as, to affect ignorance. • (n.) Affe...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/affect/

affect

affect (uh FEKT) 1. As a verb, to influence, to act on, to modfy, to impinge on, to produce an effect on, to change, to modify; concern, relate to, pertain to, interest, regard: 'The rain will affect our plans for a picnic.' 2. To pretend, to feign, to put on, to simulate, to make a pretense of, to assume, to adopt, to imitate, to counterfe...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3310/

Affect

[linguistics] In linguistics, speaker affect is attitude or emotion that a speaker brings to an utterance. Affects such as sarcasm, contempt, dismissal, distaste, disgust, disbelief, exasperation, boredom, anger, joy, respect or disrespect, sympathy, pity, gratitude, wonder, admiration, humility, and awe are frequently conveyed through para...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affect_(linguistics)

affect

Type: Term Pronunciation: af′fekt Definitions: 1. The emotional feeling, tone, and mood attached to a thought, including its external manifestations.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=1517

Affect

(Lat. ad + facere, to do) The inner motive as distinquished from the intention or end of action. Cf. Spinoza, Ethics, bk. III. -- L.W.
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/a.html

Affect

[philosophy] Affect (Latin affectus or adfectus) is a concept used in the philosophy of Baruch Spinoza and elaborated by Henri Bergson, Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari that places emphasis on bodily experience. For Spinoza, as discussed in Parts Two and Three of his Ethics, affects are states of mind and body related to (but not exactly ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affect_(philosophy)

Affect

[psychology] Affect refers to the experience of feeling or emotion. Affect is a key part of the process of an organism`s interaction with stimuli. The word also refers sometimes to affect display, which is `a facial, vocal, or gestural behavior that serves as an indicator of affect` (APA 2006). The affective domain represents one of the thr...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affect_(psychology)

Affect

pattern of observable behaviours which is the expression of a subjectively experienced feeling state
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22394

affect

have an influence upon
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/51501
No exact match found