trigger

  1. lever that activates the firing mechanism of a gun
  2. an act that sets in motion some course of events

trigger

A mechanism that actuates the firing sequence of a firearm. Triggers almost universally consist of levers or buttons actuated by the index finger.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_firearms_terms

trigger

(from the article `military technology`) ...appeared during the period 1460–80 with the development of mechanisms that applied match to hand-portable weapons. German gunsmiths apparently led ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/79

trigger

(trig´er) an event that stimulates initiation of a subsequent event or process. flow trigger a trigger for initiating assisted ventilation, consisting of a mechanism for measuring the patient's inspiratory effort and starting assisted ventilation when flow reaches a given level. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

trigger

[n] - an act that sets in motion some course of events 2. [v] - release or pull the trigger on
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=trigger

Trigger

• (n.) A piece, as a lever, which is connected with a catch or detent as a means of releasing it; especially (Firearms), the part of a lock which is moved by the finger to release the cock and discharge the piece. • (n.) A catch to hold the wheel of a carriage on a declivity.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/trigger/

trigger

noun an act that sets in motion some course of events
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=trigger

Trigger

[drums] In drumming, a trigger is an electronic transducer that can be attached to a drum, cymbal or other instrument to enable it to control an electronic drum unit or similar device. Specialized triggers are produced for specific instruments. A snare drum trigger, for example, needs two channels, one each for the rim and head, while a tom...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigger_(drums)

Trigger

[firearms] A trigger is a mechanism that actuates the firing sequence of a firearm. Triggers almost universally consist of levers or buttons actuated by the index finger. Some variations use the thumb or weak fingers to actuate the trigger, a feature typically found on mounted weapons. Examples are the M2 Browning machine gun and the Spring...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigger_(firearms)

Trigger

[guitar] Trigger is a guitar famously used by country music singer Willie Nelson. The guitar is a Martin N-20 classical guitar that Nelson purchased for $750 in 1969. Trigger `serv[es] as a guestbook for his fellow performers`, and it displays `the most egregious pickwear on God`s green earth`. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigger_(guitar)

Trigger

[Only Fools and Horses] Colin Ball, much better known as Trigger, is a fictional character in the popular BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses and its prequel Rock & Chips. He was played by Roger Lloyd-Pack in Only Fools and Horses and Lewis Osbourne in Rock & Chips. == Characteristics == A regular at The Nag`s Head pub, and old friend of Del B...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigger_(Only_Fools_and_Horses)

Trigger

[particle physics] In particle physics, a trigger is a system that uses simple criteria to rapidly decide which events in a particle detector to keep when only a small fraction of the total can be recorded. Trigger systems are necessary due to real-world limitations in data storage capacity and rates. Since experiments are typically searchi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigger_(particle_physics)

trigger

[Verb] To cause something to happen.
Example: The trigger for them moving house was Paul’s new job.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

trigger

[Verb] To set something off or in motion.
Example: The hot weather triggered an increase in ice-cream sales.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

trigger

1. A catch to hold the wheel of a carriage on a declivity. ... 2., the part of a lock which is moved by the finger to release the cock and discharge the piece. ... <zoology> Trigger fish, a large plectognath fish (Balistes Carolinensis or B. Capriscus) common on the southern coast of the United States, and valued as a food fish in some locali...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Trigger

1) The signal or the action of sending a signal to control the start of an event.
2) A device, which puts out a signal to control the start of an event, including a device that puts out such a signal when struck.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

Trigger

A brand of 65% cotton/35% polyester poplin.
Found on http://www.chezirene.com/articles/precostuming/pc110-glossary.html

Trigger

A sharp voltage pulse usually of from 0.1 to 0.4 micro-seconds duration, which is applied to the mod
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Technology/Radar/

Trigger

A trigger is the portion of the small-arm mechanism actuated by the forefinger to fire the piece. In rifles and shotguns the trigger is a lever placed beneath the lock and usually protected by a small hoop of metal called the trigger guard. The lever of a hammer-fired weapon is in direct contact with the hammer when the piece is cocked, and release...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/FT.HTM

Trigger

An environmental or personal stimulus that sets off a particular behavior.
Found on https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/9578-alzheimers-disease-glos

Trigger

An experimenter sets up 'a priori criteria' for accepting data. Once these criteria are met, an electronic signal allows events to be recorded. Not all triggers are legitimate events, however, but are the raw data recorded for computer analysis.
Found on http://www-bdnew.fnal.gov/operations/accgloss/gloss.html#A

Trigger

An oscilloscope circuit that starts a sweep, either when a previous sweep has been completed or when a determined event has been detected. An oscilloscope can usually be set to draw a waveform only when a certain event takes place, for instance when a signal is read at a certain frequency or when a previous sweep reaches a certain point. Modern dig...
Found on http://www.used-line.com/glossaries/glossary.cfm?g_id=9

trigger

In medicine, a specific event that starts a process or that causes a particular outcome. For example, chemotherapy, painful treatments, or the smells, sounds, and sights that go with them may trigger anxiety and fear in a patient who has cancer. In allergies, exposure to mold, pollen or dust may trigger sneezing, watery eyes, and coughing.
Found on http://www.cancer.gov/dictionary?expand=T

Trigger

Is a point, threshold, or event which precipitates an action, exercise, or change in behavior. The occurrence is often viewed as the catalyst of an important condition.
Found on http://www.oasismanagement.com/glossary/

Trigger

Is a point, threshold, or event which precipitates an action, exercise, or change in behavior. The occurrence is often viewed as the catalyst of an important condition.
Found on http://www.oasismanagement.com/glossary/
No exact match found