Stiver

In early 20th century English slang, a stiver was any coin of little value.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZSD.HTM

Stiver

Sti'ver noun [ Dutch stuiver ; akin to German stüber , Danish styver , Swedish styfver .] A Dutch coin, and money of account, of the value of two cents, or about one penny sterling; hence, figuratively, anything of little worth.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/200

Stiver

• (n.) A Dutch coin, and money of account, of the value of two cents, or about one penny sterling; hence, figuratively, anything of little worth.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/stiver/

Stiver

Stivers were two small coins at one time current in Holland and the Dutch colonies. The Dutch stiver was a silver coin equal to one twentieth of a gulden, another stiver was a small copper coin only current in the colonies.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/JS.HTM

Stiver

The word stiver is derived from the Dutch Stuiver. It was a currency denomination in use in Ceylon from 1801 until 1821. It was also a denomination that formed part of the currency system of Demerara-Essequibo (later British Guiana, now Guyana). A stiver had a value of one sixth of a shilling. The currency was also mentioned in the famous poem by ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stiver

stiver

thing of little or no value
Found on http://phrontistery.info/s.html
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