Solifluction

Form of mass movement in environments that experience freeze-thaw action. It is characterized by the slow movement of soil material downslope and the formation of lobe-shaped features. Also see gelifluction.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/s.html

SOLIFLUCTION

Usually relates to the slow movement or flow of saturated soil or rock fragment masses down slopes and may be applied to subaqueous flowage.
Found on http://www.cancaver.ca/docs/glossary.htm

solifluction

Movement (flow) of topsoil that has become saturated with water. It is an important process of transportation in periglacial environments where water released by the spring thaw cannot percolate downwards because the ground below is permanently frozen (permafrost). The saturated topsoil may then flow slowly downhill to form a solifluction lobe
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0035460.html

Solifluction

In geomorphology, solifluction is a gradual mass wasting slope process related to freeze-thaw activity, occurring in periglacial environments. In 1906 Johan Gunnar Andersson interpreted solifluction as a mass wasting process that occurs most commonly in colder climates where periods of freezing and thawing are regular occurrences. A type of creep ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solifluction

solifluction

A form of creep in which soil flows downslope at a rate of 0.5 to 15 centimeters per year. Solifluction occurs in relatively cold regions when the brief warmth of summer thaws only the upper meter or two of regolith, which becomes waterlogged because the underlying ground remains frozen and therefore the water cannot drain down into it.
Found on http://www.inlandlapidary.com/user_area/glossaryS.asp

solifluction

Turbulent movement of saturated soil or surficial debris.
Found on http://www.ge-at.iastate.edu/glossary-of-geologic-terms/

Solifluction

A type of mass movement in which material moves slowly downslope in areas where the soil is saturated with water. It commonly occurs in permafrost areas.
Found on http://www.evcforum.net/WebPages/Glossary_Geology.html
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