savart

a unit used in music to describe the ratio in frequency between notes. There are 301 (sometimes 300) savarts in an octave. This means two notes differ by one savart if the higher note has a frequency equal to 21/301 = 1.002 305 times the frequency of the lower note. The unit is named for a French physicist, FĂ©lix Savar...
Found on http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/dictS.html

savart

logarithmic frequency interval between two sounds having a fundamental-frequency ratio of the thousandth root of ten NOTE 1 - One octave is approximately equal to 300 savarts. NOTE 2 - The savart is used as a unit of logarithmic frequency interval.
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=801-30-12

Savart

Like the more common cent, the savart is a logarithmic measure, and thus intervals can be added by simply adding their savart values, instead of multiplying them as you would frequencies. The number of savarts in an octave is 1000 times the base-10 logarithm of 2, or nearly 301.03. Sometimes this is rounded to 300, which makes the unit more useful...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savart
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