Rococo

European decorative style, a development of baroque, in the 1730s. Rococo is characterised by curving, asymmetrical motifs based on rock, shell, floral, leaf and other natural shapes. Chinese and Indian motifs are also common. Delicate carving emphasises the curving lines of furniture, and frames are swirling and elegant. The name 'Rococo' is deriv …...

rococo

[adj] - having excessive asymmetrical ornamentation 2. [n] - fanciful but graceful asymmetric ornamentation in art and architecture that originated in France in the 18th century
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=rococo

rococo

Movement in the arts and architecture in 18th-century Europe, particularly in France, that tended towards lightness, elegance, delicacy, and decorative charm. The term `rococo` is derived from...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Rococo

Light, sensuous, intensely decorative French style developed early eighteenth century following death of Louis XIV and in reaction to the Baroque grandeur of Versailles. Name comes from French rocaille, rock-work, based on forms of sea shells and corals. In practice style of short curves, scrolls and counter curves, often elaborated with fantasy. I...
Found on http://www.tate.org.uk/collections/glossary/definition.jsp?entryId=249

Rococo

a decorative style of art and architecture often characterised by 'shell-shapes', became the final, and most flamboyant, phase of the baroque.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20935

Rococo

An artistic and architectural style typified by light and highly elaborate detail; a light, frothy flourish towards the end of the Baroque period.
Found on http://www.architecture.com/HowWeBuiltBritain/Glossary.xhtml

Rococo

Ro·co'co noun [ F.; of uncertain etymology.] A florid style of ornamentation which prevailed in Europe in the latter part of the eighteenth century.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/89

Rococo

Ro·co'co adjective Of or pertaining to the style called rococo; like rococo; florid; fantastic.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/89

rococo

adjective having excessive asymmetrical ornamentation; `an exquisite gilded rococo mirror`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=rococo

Rococo

• (n.) A florid style of ornamentation which prevailed in Europe in the latter part of the eighteenth century. • (a.) Of or pertaining to the style called rococo; like rococo; florid; fantastic.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/rococo/

Rococo

Rococo is a style of decoration which originated in France and Italy in the 17th century. It is a debased variety of the Louis-Quatorze style of ornament, preceding from it through the degeneracy of the Louis-Quinze. Rococo is generally a meaningless assemblage of scrolls and crimped conventional shell-work, wrought into all sorts of irregular and ...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TR.HTM

Rococo

A style originating in France, but utilized primarily in English and Italian cathedrals of the early 1700s, as well as in renovations of the period. Distinctively lighter in expression with an emphasis on smaller, more graceful motifs.
Found on http://www.artisansofthevalley.com/comm_gloss3.html

Rococo

Probably derived from the French 'rocaille' (pebble work) and certainly French in inspiration, probably due to the influence of Huguenot craftsmen. The rococo style consisted of motifs of shells, seaweed, corals, mermaids, shellfish and other marine themes in asymmetrical display combined with scrolls and double curves. It was in fashion between c....
Found on http://freespace.virgin.net/a.data/glossaryframes.htm

rococo

rococo (rukō'kō, rō–) , style in architecture, especially in interiors and the decorative arts, which originated in France and was widely used in Europe in the 18th cent. The term may be derived from the French words rocaille and coquille (rock and shell), natural forms p...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/world/A0842193.html

rococo

rococo, in music, 18th-century reaction against the baroque style. Less formal and grandiose in structure, it was a graceful rather than a profound style, more hedonistic than venturesome. Extreme manifestations were in French keyboard music, the finest composer in the style being François Coup...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0842194.html

Rococo

exuberant naturalistic style of decoration fashionable in the early 18th century. Associated with the work of Paul de Lamerie.
Found on http://www.myfamilysilver.com/pages/glossary.aspx?glossaryType=81

rococo

(art) Movement in the arts and architecture in 18th-century Europe, particularly in France, that tended towards lightness, elegance, delicacy, and decorative charm. The term `rococo` is derived from the French rocaille (rock- or shell-work), a soft styl...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0025031.html

Rococo

Chinese and Indian motifs are also common. Delicate carving emphasises the curving lines of furniture, and frames are swirling and elegant. The name 'Rococo' is derived from the French words rocaille (rockwork) and coquillage (shellwork). The style reached its peak in Britain c. 1740s and 50s, and was revived again in Britain and the USA in the ear...
Found on http://www.antique-marks.com/antique-terms-r.html

ROCOCO

A style of art popular in Europe in the first three quarters of the 18th century, Rococo architecture and furnishings emphasized ornate but small-scale decoration, curvilinear forms, and pastel colors. Rococo painting has a playful, light-hearted romantic quality and often pictures the aristocracy at leisure.
Found on http://www.modernsculpture.com/glossary.htm

Rococo

From the French rocaille meaning "rock work." This late Baroque (c. 1715-1775) style used in interior decoration and painting was characteristically playful, pretty, romantic, and visually loose or soft; it used small scale and ornate decoration, pastel colors, and asymmetrical arrangement of curves. Rococo was popular in France and southern German...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21532

Rococo

An eighteenth-century European style, originating in France. In reaction to the grandeur and massiveness of the baroque, rococo employed refined, elegant, highly decorative forms. Fragonard worked in this style.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21533

Rococo

[club] Rococo club was an R&B nightclub in Leicester Square, central London, England. It was home to several funky house and R&B nights including the VIP guestlist R&B, Bashment and Hip Hop Cinnamon Fridays nights. Rococo was one of the places in London where the influence of the modern American R&B dance scene is clearly evident. It was a ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rococo_(club)

Rococo

Rococo (oʊ or oʊ), less commonly roccoco, or `Late Baroque`, is an 18th-century artistic movement and style, affecting many aspects of the arts including painting, sculpture, architecture, interior design, decoration, literature, music, and theatre. It developed in the early 18th century in Paris, France as a reaction against the grandeur, sym.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rococo

Rococo

A musical style characterized as excessive, ornamental, and trivial.
Found on http://www.classicalworks.com/html/glossary.html

Rococo

A development of Baroque, it was frivolous but elegant with elaborate and superficial decoration
Found on http://quick-facts.co.uk/art/painting.html
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