Recruitment

The addition of new individuals to a population, usually either by birth or immigration.

Recruitment

The residue of those larvae that have: (1) dispersed; (2) settled at the adult site; (3) made some final movements toward the adult habitat; (4) metamorphosed successfully, and (5) survived to be detected by the observer
Found on http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/marinebio/glossary.rs.html

recruitment

[n] - the act of getting recruits
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=recruitment

Recruitment

The number of new juvenile fish reaching a size where they come large enough to catch via commercial fishing methods
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20545

Recruitment

the process by which juvenile fish enter the exploitable stock and become susceptible to fishing.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20740

Recruitment

When the trial is open for people to enter.
Found on http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/utilities/glossary/index.htm?search=r

Recruitment

The process of finding the right person for the job. This can include interviews, application forms, assessment centres and pyschometric tests etc.
Found on http://www.grb.uk.com/he_glossary.0.html

Recruitment

Additions to a population, either through birth or immigration, or, in the case of net recruitment, the differences between such additions and the losses resulting from death or emigration.
Found on http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/Townsend/Glossary/GlossaryR.html

Recruitment

Re·cruit'ment (-m e nt) noun The act or process of recruiting; especially, the enlistment of men for an army.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/27

recruitment

<neurology> The gradual increase to a maximum in a reflex when a stimulus of unaltered intensity is prolonged. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

recruitment

enlisting noun the act of getting recruits; enlisting people for the army (or for a job or a cause etc.)
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

recruitment

(re-krldbomact´mәnt) the gradual increase to a maximum in a reflex when a stimulus of unaltered intensity is prolonged. in audiology, an abnormal increase in loudness caused by a very slight increase in sound intensity, as in Meniere disease. follicle recruitment the p...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Recruitment

• (n.) The act or process of recruiting; especially, the enlistment of men for an army.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/recruitment/

recruitment

(from the article `ear, human`) ...not be heard at all by the ear with a sensorineural impairment, more intense sounds may be as loud as they are to a healthy ear. This rapid ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/20

recruitment

(from the article `guerrilla warfare`) Such are the vicissitudes of guerrilla warfare that outstanding leadership is necessary at all levels if a guerrilla force is to survive and prosper. ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/20

Recruitment

[biology] In biology, recruitment occurs when juvenile organisms survive to be added to a population. The term is generally used to refer to a stage whereby the organisms are settled and able to be detected by an observer. There are two types of recruitment: closed and open. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recruitment_(biology)

Recruitment

the addition of new individuals to a population by reproduction (Ricklefs 1979:878), commonly measured as the proportion of young in the population just before the breeding season (Ricklefs 1972:418).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22030

Recruitment

the addition of new individuals to a population by reproduction (Ricklefs 1970:878), commonly measured as the proportion of young in the population just before the breeding season (Ricklefs 1970:418).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21070

recruitment

in certain cases of hearing impairment, for example of cochlear origin, an increase of loudness with increasing stimulus magnitude at a rate greater than for a normal ear
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=801-29-30

recruitment

Type: Term Pronunciation: rē-krūt′mĕnt Definitions: 1. In the testing of hearing, the abnormally greater increase in loudness in response to increments in intensity of the acoustic stimulus in an ear with a sensory hearing loss compared with that of a normal ear. 2. In neurophysiology, the activation of additional neurons (spat...
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=76570

recruitment

(L: crescere to grow; recrescere to grow again) appearance of new organisms in a population. In fishery it means the entry of fishable individuals.
Found on http://www.seafriends.org.nz/books/glossary.htm

Recruitment

Recruitment refers to the overall process of attracting, selecting and appointing suitable candidates for jobs within an organisation, either permanent or temporary. Recruitment can also refer to processes involved in choosing individuals for unpaid positions, such as voluntary roles or training programmes. Recruitment may be undertaken in-house b...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recruitment

Recruitment

The amount of fish added to the exploitable stock each year due to growth and/or migration into the fishing area. For example, the number of fish that grow to become vulnerable to the fishing gear in one year would be the recruitment to the fishable population that year. This term is also used in referring to the number of fish from a year class re...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21804

Recruitment

the number of new young fish that enter a population in a given year. More pragmatically, it can be defined as the number of young fish that attain a size where they can be legally caught, or become susceptible to being caught by a given fishing gear.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_fishery_terms

Recruitment

the addition of new individuals to a population by reproduction (Ricklefs 1979878), commonly measured as the proportion of young in the population just before the breeding season (Ricklefs 1972418).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22216
No exact match found