rebound

  1. a movement back from an impact
  2. a reaction to a crisis or setback or frustration

rebound

v. To spring back after a weight has been removed.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/glossary_2.html

rebound

[n] - a reaction to a crisis or setback or frustration 2. [n] - the act of securing possession of the rebounding basketball after a missed shot
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=rebound

Rebound

Pain on removal of pressure
Found on http://www.gadsbywicks.co.uk/uploaded/3822.pdf

Rebound

Rebound: Return of the original symptoms when maneuvers or treatment is discontinued.
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=5233

Rebound

Re·bound' (re*bound') intransitive verb [ Prefix re- + bound : confer French rebondir .] 1. To spring back; to start back; to be sent back or reverberated by elastic force on collision with another body; as, a rebounding echo. « Bodies which are absolutely ha...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/20

Rebound

Re·bound' transitive verb To send back; to reverberate. « Silenus sung; the vales his voice rebound Dryden.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/20

Rebound

Re·bound' noun The act of rebounding; resilience. « Flew . . . back, as from a rock, with swift rebound Dryden.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/20

rebound

Just like a rebound in basketball when the ball reverses its course and bounces back off the backboard, in medicine a rebound is a reversal of response upon withdrawal of the stimulus. ... (12 Dec 1998) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

rebound

noun the act of securing possession of the rebounding basketball after a missed shot
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=rebound

rebound

(re´bound) a reversed response occurring upon withdrawal of a stimulus. acid rebound an increased rate of gastric acid secretion occurring 30 to 60 minutes after eating. heparin rebound the return of anticoagulant activity following neutralization of hepari...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Rebound

• (v. t.) To send back; to reverberate. • (n.) The act of rebounding; resilience. • (v. i.) To give back an echo. • (v. i.) To bound again or repeatedly, as a horse. • (v. i.) To spring back; to start back; to be sent back or reverberated by elastic force on collision with another body; as, a rebounding echo.Rebound: words ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/rebound/

Rebound

(from the article `Stewart, Donald Ogden`) ...witty repartee of its members, Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley, and others. In 1928 he made his New York City acting debut as Nick Potter in ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/19

rebound

(from the article `basketball`) Both teams attempting to gain possession of the ball after any try for a basket that is unsuccessful, but the ball does not go out-of-bounds and ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/19

Rebound

A swing to a high level of glucose (sugar) in the blood after having a low level. See also: Somogyi effect.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary099.htm

Rebound

[dating] A rebound is an undefined period following the break up of a romantic relationship. The term`s use dates to at least the 1830s, when Mary Russell Mitford wrote of `nothing so easy as catching a heart on the rebound`. The term may also refer to a romantic relationship that a person has during the rebound period, or to the partner in...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebound_(dating)

Rebound

Wet shotcrete or sand and cement which bounces away from a surface again at which pneumatically applied mortar is being projected.
Found on http://www.moxie-intl.com/glossary.htm

rebound

when a player grabs a ball that is coming off the rim or backboard after a shot attempt; see offensive rebound and defensive rebound.
Found on http://www.firstbasesports.com/basketball_glossary.html

rebound

a puck that bounces off the goalie`s body or equipment.
Found on http://www.firstbasesports.com/hockey_glossary.html

Rebound

When a shot hits a goaltender and bounces back into play it is known as a rebound. Red line: The center line that divides the rink. Referee: The referee is the main official in charge of the game. The referee calls all penalties and indicates when goals are scored. RICE: RICE is an acronym that is useful in remembering i...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21159

rebound

Type: Term Pronunciation: rē′bownd Definitions: 1. Act or condition of recovery or improvement in a patient.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=76340

Rebound

this occurs when the price of an instrument starts to recover.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21566

Rebound

[basketball] A rebound in basketball is the act of successfully gaining possession of the basketball after a missed field goal or free throw. Rebounds in basketball are a routine part in the game, as all possessions change after a shot is successfully made. == Types of rebounds == A ball does not need to actually `rebound` off the rim or ba...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebound_(basketball)

Rebound

[sports] Rebound is a term used in sports to describe the ball (or puck or other object of play) becoming available for possession by either opponent after an attempt to put the ball or puck into the goal has been unsuccessful. Rebounds are generally considered to be a major part of the game, as they often lead either to a possession change...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebound_(sports)

Rebound

Rebound can refer to: ==Film and television== ==Music== ==Sports== ==Other uses== ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebound
No exact match found