radioisotope

Form of a chemical element with unstable neutron number, so that it undergoes spontaneous nuclear disintegration. Major use in biology is to trace the fate of atoms or molecules that follow the same metabolic pathway or enzymic fate as the normal stable isotope, but that can be detected with high sensitivity by their emission of radiation. Also used to locate the position of the radioactive metabolite, as in autoradiography, and to measure relative rates of synthesis of compounds from radioactive precursors. ...

radioisotope

[n] - a radioactive isotope of an element
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radioisotope

Compare with isotope. A radioactive isotope. For example, tritium is a radioisotope of hydrogen.
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Radioisotope

Contraction for words radioactive isotope of an element.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/1442-Radioisotope

Radioisotope

Radioisotope: A version of a chemical element that has an unstable nucleus and emits radiation during its decay to a stable form. Radioisotopes have important uses in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research. A radioisotope is so-named because it is a radioactive isotope, an isotope being an alternate version of a chemical element that has a diff...
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radioisotope

<chemical, radiobiology> Form of a chemical element with unstable neutron number, so that it undergoes spontaneous nuclear disintegration. Major use in biology is to trace the fate of atoms or molecules that follow the same metabolic pathway or enzymic fate as the normal stable isotope, but that can be detected with high sensitivity by their ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

radioisotope

noun a radioactive isotope of an element; produced either naturally or artificially
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=radioisotope

radioisotope

(ra″de-o-i´sә-tōp) an isotope that is radioactive, consisting of atoms with unstable nuclei that undergo radioactive decay to stable forms; they emit characteristic radiation in the form of alpha, beta, or gamma rays. These may occur naturally, as in the cases of radium and uranium, or may be created ar...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

radioisotope

Type: Term Pronunciation: rā′dē-ō-ī′sō-tōp Definitions: 1. An isotope that changes to a more stable state by emitting radiation.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=74957

Radioisotope

[biology] ===Hurricane Isabel=== Category:Featured picture nominations Category:Featured picture nominations/February 2008 ...
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radioisotope

radioactive species of a given element
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radioisotope

a radioactive isotope of a specified element
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radioisotope

radioisotope: see radioactive isotope.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0917936.html

Radioisotope

In chemistry, a radioisotope is a radioactive isotope, often used as a tracer in scientific research.
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radioisotope

Naturally occurring or synthetic radioactive form of an element. Most radioisotopes are made by bombarding a stable element with neutrons in the core of a nuclear reactor (see fission). The radiations given off by radioisotopes are easy to detect (hence their use as tracers), can in some instances penetrate substantial thicknesses of materials, and...
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radioisotope

An unstable form of a chemical element that releases radiation as it breaks down and becomes more stable. Radioisotopes may occur in nature or be made in a laboratory. In medicine, they are used in imaging tests and in treatment. Also called radionuclide.
Found on http://www.cancer.gov/dictionary?expand=R

Radioisotope

Radioisotopes, the most common being Carbon-14, are isotopes of elements which contain a high number of neutrons thus causing them to be structurally unstable. As a result the isotope may emit alpha, beta, or gamma radiation in order to become more stable. ...
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Radioisotope

Injecting a radioactive substance into the body in order to make pictures with a nuclear scanner.
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Radioisotope

Term applied to a radioactive isotope, such as carbon-14 or uranium 238. Radioisotope nuclei are uns
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Science/Biology/

Radioisotope

A radioactive isotope. For example, tritium is a radioisotope of hydrogen.
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Radioisotope

An unstable or radioactive isotope (form) of an element that can change into another element by givi
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22412

Radioisotope

An unstable or radioactive isotope (form) of an element that can change into another element by givi
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22412

Radioisotope

An unstable or radioactive isotope (form) of an element that can change into another element by givi
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22412
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