proton

A positively charged particle that is found in the nucleus of an atom and has a mass approximately 1836 times that of an electron.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22291

Proton

a small atomic particle, typically found within an atom's nucleus, that possesses a positive electrical charge. Even though protons and neutrons are about 2,000 times heavier than electrons, they are tiny. The number of protons is unique for each chemical element. See also nucleon.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21808

Proton

The proton is a subatomic particle, symbol {SubatomicParticle|Proton} or {SubatomicParticle|Proton+}, with a positive electric charge of 1 elementary charge and mass slightly less than that of a neutron. Protons and neutrons, each with mass approximately one atomic mass unit, are collectively referred to as `nucleons`. One or more protons are pr.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton

PROTON

The PROTON Ontology (PROTo ONtology) is a basic upper-level ontology that contains about 300 classes and 100 properties, providing coverage of the general concepts necessary for a wide range of tasks, including semantic annotation, indexing, and retrieval of documents. Its design principles can be summarized as: It was developed under the auspices...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PROTON

Proton

- the positively charged elements of the nucleus of an atom. A hydrogen atom without its electron amounts to a single proton charge.
Found on http://www.eclipse.co.uk/moordent/page5.html

proton

(p+) Compare with electron and neutron. An elementary particle found the atomic nucleus with a positive charge equal and opposite that of the electron. Protons have a mass of 1.007276 daltons.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/p.shtml

proton

(pro´ton) an elementary particle of mass number 1, with a positive charge equal to the negative charge of the electron; a constituent particle of every nucleus, the number of protons in the nucleus of each atom of a chemical element being indicated by its atomic number.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

proton

(pro;ton) A unit of positive charge in the nucleus of atoms.
Found on http://www.mhhe.com/biosci/abio/glossary.mhtml

proton

[n] - a stable particle with positive charge equal to the negative charge of an electron
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=proton

proton

<physics> An elementary atomic particle with a positive charge and a mass of about 1 amu. ... (09 Oct 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

proton

noun a stable particle with positive charge equal to the negative charge of an electron
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=proton

proton

(p) Type: Term Pronunciation: prō′ton Definitions: 1. The positively charged unit of the nuclear mass; protons form part (or in hydrogen 1 the whole) of the nucleus of the atom around which the negative electrons revolve.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=73137

Proton

[bank card] Proton is an electronic purse application for debit cards in Belgium. The system was introduced in February 1995 with the goal to replace cash primarily for small transactions around € 15. For security, the card is limited to storing 125.00 EUR of available electronic cash (originally 5,000 BEF). The card is used for small pay...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton_(bank_card)

Proton

[rocket family] Proton (Russian: Протон) (formal designation: UR-500) is an expendable launch system used for both commercial and Russian government space launches. The first Proton rocket was launched in 1965. Modern versions of the launch system are still in use as of 2014, making it one of the most successful heavy boosters in the ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton_(rocket_family)

Proton

[supermarkets] Proton is a Greek based retail chain of independent retailers (primarily grocery shops) operating as a brand and buying group (or symbol group). All stores are independently owned. The parent company (ELETA LTD) is communally owned with each retailer owning a share. As of 2006, the Proton retail network consists of around 390...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton_(supermarkets)

Proton

A baryon with electric charge +1. Protons contain a basic structure of two up quarks and one down quark . The nucleus of a hydrogen atom is a proton. A nucleus with atomic number Z contains Z protons; therefore the number of protons is what distinguishes the different chemical elements.
Found on http://www2.slac.stanford.edu/vvc/glossary.html

proton

A fundamental particle of matter. Provides a positive charge in the nucleus of an atom.
Found on http://www.ge-at.iastate.edu/glossary-of-geologic-terms/

proton

a heavy subatomic particle with a positive charge; found in an atomic nucleus.
Found on http://www.cliffsnotes.com/test-prep/tools-and-resources/chemistry-glossary

proton

a particle in the center of the atom that has a positive charge.
Found on http://www.mcwdn.org/chemist/chemglos.html

Proton

A positively charged elementary particle. A proton is 1836 times heavier than an electron.
Found on http://hesperia.gsfc.nasa.gov/sftheory/glossary.htm

Proton

A positively charged subatomic particle found in the nucleus.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/1311-Proton

proton

A positively charged subatomic particle found, together with neutrons, in the nuclei of atoms; the name comes from the Greek protos meaning 'first' and was coined by Ernest Rutherford in 1920. The mass of the proton is 1836.12 times that of the electron. The number of protons determines the chemical...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/P/proton.html

Proton

A positively-charged particle (baryon) consisting of two up and onedownquarks which is found in and makes up the atomicnucleus.
Found on http://hepwww.rl.ac.uk/public/phil/glossary.html

Proton

A proton is a positively charged sub-atomic particle.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GP.HTM

proton

A small, positively charged particle of matter found in the atoms of all elements. Streams of protons generated by special equipment can be used for radiation treatment.
Found on http://www.cancer.gov/dictionary?expand=P
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