Precession

Circular motion about the axis of rotation of a body; fixed with respect to the stars. The Earth is a giant gyroscope whose axis passes through the North and South Poles and this axis precesses with a period of 27,700 years.

Precession

can refer to a slow change in the orientation of an object's axis of rotation. For the Earth, this is referred to as the precession of the equinoxes. Apsidal precession means a steady change in the orientation of an orbit, such as the precession in the orbit of Mercury that was explained by the theory of general relativity.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_astronomy

Precession

Precession is a change in the orientation of the rotational axis of a rotating body. In an appropriate reference frame it can be defined as a change in the first Euler angle, whereas the third Euler angle defines the rotation itself. In other words, the axis of rotation of a precessing body itself rotates around another axis. A motion in which the...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precession

Precession

• (n.) The act of going before, or forward.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/precession/

precession

precedence noun the act of preceding in time or order or rank (as in a ceremony)
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Precession

[mechanical] Precession, also called epicyclic fretting precession, (or more accurately hypocyclic fretting precession since `epicyclic` applies to a round part spinning outside a circle and `hypocyclic` applies to a round part spinning inside a circle) is the process of a round part in a round hole rotating with respect to that hole becaus...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precession_(mechanical)

Precession

Pre·ces'sion noun [ Latin praecedere , praecessum , to go before: confer French précession . See Precede .] The act of going before, or forward. Lunisolar precession . (Astron.) See under Lunisolar . -- Planetary precession , ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/144

Precession

A change in the direction of the axis of spin of a rotating body.
Found on http://www.braeunig.us/space/glossary.htm

precession

a change of longitude, measured in the frame of reference defined by the primary body and the stars, of a characteristic point in a satellite orbit, such as the ascending node NOTE 1 - Precession of the orbit of a satellite is caused by a perturbation of its orbital motion, due for instance to non-uniformities in the distribution of mass in the pri...
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=725-11-26

precession

a conical motion of the axis of rotation of a rotating body about a direction fixed in relation to the stars, due to the application of an external force NOTE - Precession of a rotating body should not be confused with precession of the orbit of a satellite.
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=725-11-53

Precession

A modern term, derived from the precession of the equinoxes and meaning a motion around a cone of the rotation axis of a spinning body. See also: Gyroscope.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/p/r/precession/source.html

precession

A slow, periodic conical motion of the rotation axis of a spinning body, most familiar in the wobbling of a toy top or gyroscope. Earth's axis precesses, once around every 25,800 years, as a result of it not being perpendicular to the ecliptic (the plane of Earth's orbit around the Sun). Being tippe...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/P/precession.html

Precession

Periodic change in the direction of an objects axis caused by the gravitational influence from another body.
Found on http://planetfacts.org/space-terms/

precession

phenomenon associated with the action of a gyroscope or a spinning top and consisting of a comparatively slow rotation of the axis of rotation of a ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/107

precession

precession 1. The act or fact of preceding; precedence. 2. In astronomy: the slow, conical motion of the earth's axis of rotation, caused by the gravitational attraction of the sun and moon, and, to a smaller extent, of the planets, on the equatorial bulge of the earth. In certain contexts, 'precession' may refer to the precession that the Earth ...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1744/3

precession

precession: see gyroscope.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0917731.html

precession

The act of going before, or forward. Lunisolar precession. ... <astronomy> The slow backward motion of the equinoctial points along the ecliptic, at the rate of 50.2<sec/ annually, caused by the action of the sun, moon, and planets, upon the protuberant matter about the earth's equator, in connection with its diurnal rotation; so called be...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Precession

The apparent shift of the celestial poles caused by a gradual wobble of the Earth's axis.
Found on http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-glossary.html

Precession

The circular motion of Earth's axis around the pole of the ecliptic, caused by the gravitational pul
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Science/Astrology/

Precession

The Earth behaves like a spinning top. Its poles are spinning in circles causing the poles to point in different directions over time. It takes 25,800 years for the Earth to complete one precession.
Found on http://www.kidsastronomy.com/dictionary.htm

Precession

The slow circular movement, or 'wobble', of the Earth's axis of rotation around another axis.
Found on http://www.bgs.ac.uk/discoveringGeology/glossary.html

Precession

This is the slow movement of the celestial poles tracing out large circles on the celestial sphere. It is caused by a slow wobble in the Earth's axis due to the gravitational effects of the Sun and Moon on the Earth's equatorial bulge. A reasonable analogy is that of a spinning top - As the top slows down it will start to wobble. This 'Earth wobble...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20448

precession

[n] - the motion of a spinning body (as a top) in which it wobbles so that the axis of rotation sweeps out a cone 2. [n] - the act of preceding (as in a ceremony)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=precession
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