Migration

1. Hydrocarbons are often found in formations other than those in which their organic source was deposited. This movement of hydrocarbons, often over considerable distances is known as migration.
2. Migration is also a process applied to data recorded, e.g. in a '3-D' seismic survey, to adjust for the effects of the 'oblique' angle at which it was gathered. ...

Migration

1. in general, any movement of an animal from one location to another. 2. specifically, a predictable, recurring group movement that is characteristic of the members of a given species, and that occurs regularly in response to seasonal changes in temperature, precipitation, and so on (Morris 1992)
Found on http://imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/bio/glsry.htm

Migration

Spreading or creeping of a constituent of a compound onto/into adjacent surfaces. See bleeding.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

migration

(1) The (usually intramolecular) transfer of an atom or group during the course of a molecular rearrangement. (2) The movement of a bond to a new position, within the same molecular entity, is known as 'bond migration'. Allylic rearrangements, e.g., RCH=CHCH2X RCH(X)CH=CH2 exemplify both types of migration.
Found on http://www.chem.qmul.ac.uk/iupac/gtpoc/M.html

Migration

(CONTROL SYSTEMS GLOSSARY) When manufacturers produce new products they usually provide a migration path whereby their existing clients can upgrade their systems without total replacement. Rival manufacturers also provide migration paths away from the systems of others' in order to gain market share.
Found on http://www.instrument-net.co.uk/control_systemglossary.html

migration

(from the article `boreal forest`) ...as far south as 30° N latitude by the continental glaciers of Europe, Asia, and North America and by the hyperarid and extremely cold environments ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/89

migration

(from the article `chromatography`) ...into the system in a confined region or narrow zone (the origin), whereupon the different species are transported at different rates in the ... ...sieving can also be important applications of gels; in this case the pore dimensions of the gel are comparable to the dimensions of the ... [2 relate...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/89

migration

(from the article `petroleum`) Accumulations of petroleum are usually found in relatively coarse-grained, permeable, and porous sedimentary reservoir rocks that contain little, if ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/89

migration

(L: migrare to move/travel) moving actively from one place to another by crawling, swimming, flying. The extent of the ocean horizontally is vast, and places which differ in temperature, are located far apart. Horizontal migrations (transoceanic migrations) are done most successfully by large organisms (enjoying economics of scale), which also have...
Found on http://www.seafriends.org.nz/books/glossary.htm

migration

[n] - a group of people migrating together (especially in some given time period) 2. [n] - (chemistry) the nonrandom movement of an atom or radical from one place to another within a molecule 3. [n] - the periodic passage of groups of animals (especially birds or fishes) from one region to another for feeding or breeding 4. [n] -...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=migration

Migration

• (n.) The act of migrating.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/migration/

migration

noun the movement of persons from one country or locality to another
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=migration

Migration

Mi·gra'tion noun [ Latin migratio : confer French migration .] The act of migrating.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/65

migration

1. Passing from one part to another, said of certain morbid processes or symptoms. ... Synonym: diapedesis. ... 3. Movement of a tooth or teeth out of normal position. ... 4. Movement of molecules during electrophoresis. ... Origin: L. Migro, pp. -atus, to move from place to place ... (05 Mar 2000) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Migration

A database migration is a set of changes to the database that can be executed and reversed to provide consistency to the database structure. An example of this is adding a column or table to the database. Migrations are marked with a timestamp so that each database knows the most recent change that was made.
Found on https://gorails.com/glossary

Migration

A form of dispersal involving long-distance movements under at least partial control of the insects.
Found on http://www.ag.auburn.edu/enpl/courses/glossary.htm

Migration

a patterned movement of organisms that usually covers large relative distances. Ex.: Plankton can move up and down in the water column over the course of a day and whales can move around an ocean over a season.
Found on http://www.coml.org/edu/glossary/g1.htm

Migration

A seasonal move from one place to another place (sometimes from one climate to another climate).
Found on http://www.conservewildlifenj.org/glossary/

Migration

a systematic (as opposed to random) movement of individuals in a fish stock from one place to another.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_fishery_terms

Migration

a systematic (as opposed to random) movement of individuals in a fish stock from one place to another.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary245.php

migration

in ethology, the regular, usually seasonal, movement of all or part of an animal population to and from a given area. Familiar migrants include many ... [35 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/89

migration

migration 1. Movement of human populations from one area to another, usually resulting in cultural contact. 2. The act or process of moving from one region or country to another. 3. A group of birds, fish, or other animals that are moving together from one region or country to another for feeding or breeding purposes. 4. A group of people migrat...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1310/

Migration

Migration is a yearly movement in which some animals travel to avoid bad weather, to find food, or to reproduce. Some migrators (animals who migrate) travel short distances, other go thousands of miles. Migrators travel by flying, swimming, walking, hopping, burrowing, or slithering. True migrators make a two-way trip each year from one place to an...
Found on http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/dinosaurs/glossary/

migration

migration, of people, geographical movements of individuals or groups for the purpose of permanently resettling.Sections in this article:IntroductionEarly HistoryLater MigrationsModern Migration TrendsBibliography
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0833130.html

Migration

Movement from one area to another
Found on http://myfwc.com/research/saltwater/crustaceans/blue-crabs/glossary/
No exact match found