meat

Apart from at the banquets of the rich, meat was rarely a part of the Roman diet. The poor could seldom afford to buy meat and so the ordinary Roman was not a great eater of meats. During the early Republic, it had been eaten only when an animal was sacrificed to the gods. Typical meats eaten were beef, veal, lamb, mutton, dormice, sausage, goat, s…...

Meat

Meat is animal flesh that is eaten as food.{rp|1} Humans are omnivorous, and have hunted and killed animals for meat since prehistoric times. The advent of civilization allowed the domestication of animals such as chickens, sheep, fish, seafood, pigs and cattle, and eventually their use in meat production on an industrial scale. Meat is mainly com...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meat

meat

(from the article `meat processing`) preparation of meat for human consumption.Generally meats consist of about 20 percent protein, 20 percent fat, and 60 percent water. The amount of fat present in a particular portion of meat ... Avian striated muscles contain a respiratory pigment, myoglobin. There are relatively few myoglobin-contai...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/60

Meat

(from the article `Piñera, Virgilio`) ...even with madness. The world seems to collapse on his protagonists, who resort to drastic measures, such as that taken by the main character in ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/60

meat

[n] - the flesh of animals (including fishes and birds and snails) used as food
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=meat

Meat

• (n.) Specifically, dinner; the chief meal. • (n.) Food, in general; anything eaten for nourishment, either by man or beast. Hence, the edible part of anything; as, the meat of a lobster, a nut, or an egg. • (n.) The flesh of animals used as food; esp., animal muscle; as, a breakfast of bread and fruit without meat. • (v. t.) T...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/meat/

meat

noun the inner and usually edible part of a seed or grain or nut or fruit stone; `black walnut kernels are difficult to get out of the shell`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=meat

Meat

Meat noun [ Middle English mete , Anglo-Saxon mete ; akin to Old Saxon mat , meti , Dutch met hashed meat, German mett wurst sausage, Old High German maz food, Icelandic matr , Swedish mat , Danish mad , Goth. mats . Con...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/37

Meat

Meat transitive verb To supply with food. [ Obsolete] Tusser. « His shield well lined, his horses meated well.» Chapman.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/37

meat

1. Food, in general; anything eaten for nourishment, either by man or beast. Hence, the edible part of anything; as, the meat of a lobster, a nut, or an egg. 'And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, . . . To you it shall be for meat.' (Gen. I. 29) 'Every moving thing that liveth shall be meat for you.' (Gen. Ix. 3) ... 2. Th...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

meat

Flesh of animals taken as food, in Western countries chiefly from domesticated herds of cattle, sheep, pigs, and poultry. Major exporters include Argentina, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the USA, and Denmark (chiefly bacon). The practice of cooking meat is at least 600,000 years old. More than 40% of the world's grain is now fed to animal...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0020844.html

Meat

Meat is British slang for a person as a sex object.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZM.HTM

meat

meat, term for the flesh of animals used for food, especially that of cattle, sheep, lambs, and swine, as distinct from game, poultry, and fish; sometimes it is inclusive of all animal flesh. The chief constituents of meat are water, protein, and fat. Phosphorus, iron, and vitamins are also containe...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0832425.html

MEAT

Most Economically Advantageous Tender
Found on http://www.tendermatch.co.uk/glossary.html

Meat

Tissue of the animal body that are used for food.
Found on http://www.epa.gov/oecaagct/ag101/beefglossary.html
No exact match found