Lemonade

Lemonade is a lemon-flavored drink sweetened with sugar. In different parts of the world, there are variations on the drink and its name. Pink lemonade and frozen lemonade are also prepared. Limeade substitutes out the lemons for limes. In North America, certain European and African countries, and most Asian countries lemonade is usually made from...
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lemonade

[n] - sweetened beverage of diluted lemon juice
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Lemonade

• (n.) A beverage consisting of lemon juice mixed with water and sweetened.
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lemonade

noun sweetened beverage of diluted lemon juice
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Lemonade

Lem`onĀ·ade' (lĕm`ŭn*ād') noun [ French limonade ; confer Spanish limonada , Italian limonata . See Lemon .] A beverage consisting of lemon juice mixed with water and sweetened.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/28

Lemonade

A popular beverage made of lemon juice, sugar, and water.
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lemonade

carbonated lemonade, including clear, cloudy and traditional varieties
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20509

Lemonade

In the US, a drink made of lemon juice, sugar and water; in the UK, a carbonated drink that doesn't necessarily contain anything closer to a lemon than a bit of citric acid. Sprite (TM) and 7-Up (TM) are examples of what would be called lemonade in many countries.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22282

Lemonade

Lemonade is London Cockney rhyming slang for spade.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZL.HTM

Lemonade

Lemonade is properly a drink made of water, sugar, and the juice of lemons. A traditional recipe for real lemonade is: two sliced lemons, 2.5 ounces of sugar, boiling water, 1.5 pint; mix, cover up the vessel, let it stand, with occasional stirring, until cold, then strain off the liquid.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/QL.HTM
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