Kabuki

Traditional form of Japanese theatre still practised today by a select group of male actors in Japan.

Kabuki

The individual kanji, from left to right, mean sing (歌), dance (舞), and skill (伎). Kabuki is therefore sometimes translated as `the art of singing and dancing`. These are, however, ateji characters which do not reflect actual etymology. The kanji of `skill` generally refers to a performer in kabuki theatre. Since the word kabuki is belie...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kabuki

Kabuki

A Japanese dance drama featuring stylized narrative choreographic movements.
Found on http://www.centralhome.com/dance-dictionary.htm

Kabuki

A traditional style of Japanese theatre
Found on http://www.wafuku.co.uk/glossary.htm

Kabuki

Japanese theatrical form popular since the Edo period (1603-1868) and the source of many musical genres. There are two main kinds of Kabuki play:jidaimono or pseudo-historical pieces and...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

kabuki

kabuki (käbOO'kē) : see Asian drama.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0915010.html

Kabuki

Popular form of theater developed in the early Edo Period. The Bakufu attempted on six occasions to ban Kabuki (which was considered vulgar) without success. Kabuki did evolve over time, however
Found on the earlier forms featured female players, who were later banned.

Kabuki

The kabuki is a traditional Japanese form of drama with highly stylised song, mime and dance, performed solely by male actors.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AK.HTM

Kabuki

traditional Japanese popular drama with singing and dancing performed in a highly stylized manner. A rich blend of music, dance, mime, and ... [20 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/k/1
No exact match found