indemnity

  1. protection against future loss
  2. legal exemption from liability for damages
  3. a sum of money paid in compensation for loss or injury

indemnity

An agreement to make good any loss suffered as a result of an act or failure to act by another

Indemnity

If a share certificate has been lost and a duplicate issued then the shareholder has to indemnify the registrar in the event that the lost certificate has been or is subsequently sold by someone else. However, for a fee, the investor can effectively insure against having to pay the full cost of the lost shares by applying for a letter of indemnity. ...

Indemnity

Insurance against possible loss or damage.

Indemnity

Health insurance benefits provided in the form of cash payments rather than services. Insurance program in which covered person is reimbursed for covered expenses. An indemnity insurance contract usually defines the maximum amounts that will be paid for covered services. Indemnity insurance plans may have a PPO option, UR and case management featur...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20102

indemnity

[n] - protection against future loss 2. [n] - legal exemption from liability for damages
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=indemnity

Indemnity

Applies to insurance policies and means the insurer will basically make sure you are no better or worse off in the event of a claim, taking into account wear and tear.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20452

Indemnity

An agreement by one party that he will pay to another the amount of liability which may be suffered by the second party is known as Indemnity.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20456

Indemnity

A promise to compensate another for a wrongdoing, expense or loss incurred. To be distinguished from a guarantee which relates to the obligations of another and may not be a primary obligation.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20460

Indemnity

Insurance principle by which a policyholder is placed in the same financial position after a loss, as they were immediately before it.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20546

Indemnity

An agreement in which one person is answerable for compensating the losses of another.... <a target=_blank href='http://www.finance-glossary.com/terms/indemnity.htm?id=725&ginPtrCode=00000&PopupMode=false' title='Read full definition of indemnity'>more</a>
Found on http://www.finance-glossary.com/pages/home.htm

indemnity

In law, an undertaking to compensate another for damage, loss, trouble, or expenses, or the money paid by way of such compensation - for example, under fire-insurance agreements. An act of...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Indemnity

An undertaking by one person to save another harmless from loss. Most insurance policies and many guarantees come within the definition of indemnity.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20912

Indemnity

a promise by a third party to pay a debt owed, or repay a loss caused, by another party. Unlike a guarantee, the person owed can get the money direct from the indemnifier without having to chase the debtor first. Insurance contracts are contracts of indemnity: the insurance company pays first, and then tries to recover the loss from whoever caused ...
Found on http://www.businessballs.com/businesscontractstermsdefinitionsglossary.htm

Indemnity

In·dem'ni·ty noun ; plural Indemnities . [ Latin indemnitas , from indemnis uninjured: confer French indemnité . See Indemnify .] 1. Security; insurance; exemption from loss or damage, past or to come; immunity from penalty, or the punishment of pa...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/41

indemnity

noun protection against future loss
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=indemnity

Indemnity

A legal obligation to cover a liability, however arising.
Found on http://www.duke.edu/~charvey/Classes/wpg/bfglosi.htm

indemnity

A kind of insurance, in which payment is made (often in previously determined amounts) for injuries suffered, not for the costs of recovery. The payment is designed not to be a dependent on anything the patient can control. From the point of view of the insurer, this mechanism avoids the moral hazard problem of victim spending too much in recovery....
Found on http://www.econterms.com/glossary.cgi?query=indemnity

Indemnity

• (n.) Indemnification, compensation, or remuneration for loss, damage, or injury sustained. • (n.) Security; insurance; exemption from loss or damage, past or to come; immunity from penalty, or the punishment of past offenses; amnesty.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/indemnity/

indemnity

(from the article `insurance`) ...in the name of the insured to recover the loss from the negligent neighbour. The principle of subrogation is complemented by another basic ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/15

INDEMNITY

An insurance company's payment to a plaintiff in settlement or adjudication of a claim.
Found on http://www.glossarycentral.com/legal/indemnity.html

Indemnity

An agreement whereby one party agrees to secure another against an anticipated loss or damage. For example, someone may agree to turn a business over to another person for a reduced price if they pay the debts and other obligations of the business. In a broad sense, insurance policies are indemnity contracts. (2) A provision in a lease that require...
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def/i027.htm

Indemnity

Compensation for loss,damages or injuries that have already occurred or will occur in future.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

Indemnity

Indemnity is a term frequently employed in politics and jurisprudence. It is used in various significations, but is usually applied to an act of the legislature passed for the purpose of relieving individuals, especially in an official position, from the penalties to which they may have rendered themselves liable by some violation of the law whethe...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AI.HTM

indemnity

In law, an undertaking to compensate another for damage, loss, trouble, or expenses, or the money paid by way of such compensation – for example, under fire-insurance agreements
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0012006.html
No exact match found