inclusion

  1. the state of being included
  2. the relation of comprising something
  3. any small intracellular body found within another (characteristic of certain diseases)
  4. the act of including

Inclusion

A foreign solid which is enclosed in the mass of an otherwise homogeneous mineral or material.

Inclusion

Letting someone join in an activity and feel welcome.

inclusion

[n] - the state of being included 2. [n] - the relation of comprising something 3. [n] - the act of including
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=inclusion

Inclusion

Slag or other foreign matter entrapped during welding. The defect is usually more irregular in shape than a gas pore.
Found on http://www.meg.co.uk/courses/gl.php

Inclusion

Foreign particle present as an undesirable impurity in a material.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/i/n/inclusion/source.html

Inclusion

Physical and mechanical discontinuity occurring within a material or part.
Found on http://www.komprex.com/Glossary/index.htm

Inclusion

Placement and education of students with disabilities in general education classrooms with students of the same age who do not have disabilities.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20898

Inclusion

Educating all pupils, whatever their needs, within mainstream schools.
Found on http://www.wolverhampton.gov.uk/education_learning/schools/governors/glossa

Inclusion

In·clu'sion noun [ Latin inclusio : confer French inclusion . See Include .] 1. The act of including, or the state of being included; limitation; restriction; as, the lines of inclusion of his policy. Sir W. Temple. 2. (Min.) A foreign subst...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/33

inclusion

1. The act of including, or the state of being included; limitation; restriction; as, the lines of inclusion of his policy. ... 2. <chemical> A foreign substance, either liquid or solid, usually of minute size, inclosed in the mass of a mineral. ... Origin: L. Inclusio: cf. F. Inclusion. See Include. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Ma...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

inclusion

noun the act of including
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=inclusion

inclusion

(in-kloo´zhәn) the act of enclosing or the condition of being enclosed. anything that is enclosed; a cell inclusion. cell inclusion a usually lifeless, often temporary, constituent in the cytoplasm of a cell. fetal inclusion a partially ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Inclusion

• (n.) The act of including, or the state of being included; limitation; restriction; as, the lines of inclusion of his policy. • (n.) A foreign substance, either liquid or solid, usually of minute size, inclosed in the mass of a mineral.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/inclusion/

inclusion

(from the article `Allende meteorite`) The Allende meteorite, which is classified as a carbonaceous chondrite, consists of large, irregularly shaped white inclusions and rounded chondrules ... Garnets commonly contain many inclusions—i.e., fragments of other rocks and minerals. Pinwheel garnet and snowball garnet are designations s...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/15

Inclusion

[logic] In logic and mathematics, inclusion is the concept that all the contents of one object are also contained within a second object. The modern symbol for inclusion first appears in Gergonne (1816), who defines it as one idea `containing` or being `contained` by another, using the backward letter `C` to express this. Peirce articulated...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclusion_(logic)

inclusion

Type: Term Pronunciation: in-klū′zhŭn Definitions: 1. Any foreign or heterogeneous substance contained in a cell or in any tissue or organ, not introduced as a result of trauma. 2. The process by which a foreign or heterogeneous structure is misplaced in another tissue.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=44050

Inclusion

A particle of foreign matter contained within a gemstone. It can take, for example, the form of an air bubble or a foreign object. Some inclusions decrease the value of a stone, but some, such as needles in rutilated quartz and 'spangles' in amber , are prized.
Found on http://www.braybrook.co.uk/jewellery-and-silver-wisdom/gems-of-information/

Inclusion

[value and practice] Inclusion is an organizational practice and goal stemming from the sociological notion of inclusiveness which is the political action and personal effort but at the same time the presence of inclusion practices in which different groups or individuals having different backgrounds like origin, age, race and ethnicity, re...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclusion_(value_and_practice)

Inclusion

[disability rights] Inclusion is a term used by people with disabilities and other disability rights advocates for the idea that all people should freely, openly and without pity accommodate any person with a disability without restrictions or limitations of any kind{Citation needed|reason=your explanation here|date=May 2013}. Although disa...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclusion_(disability_rights)

Inclusion

[set theory] ==Rationale for fair use in In the Sign of Evil page== The image linked here is claimed to be used under fair use because: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclusion_(set_theory)

Inclusion

[education] Inclusion in education is an approach once thought only necessary for educating students with special educational needs. Now it is crucial that all teachers ensure inclusive practice for all students in their classroom and the wider school. Under the inclusion model, students with special needs spend most or all of their time wi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclusion_(education)

Inclusion

A non metallic slug of material which has become entangled in the metal during its manufacture. A severe problem in thin cross section metal bellows manufacture.
Found on http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com/Charts/Glossary-html/Glossary_I.html

inclusion

any foreign material within a synthetic quartz crystal made visible when examined by light from a bright source NOTE - A particularly common inclusion is the mineral acmite (sodium iron silicate).
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=561-05-06

inclusion

presence of foreign bodies just below the record surface having the effect of raising it
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=806-13-76
No exact match found