Inclusion

A foreign solid which is enclosed in the mass of an otherwise homogeneous mineral or material.

inclusion

  1. the state of being included
  2. the relation of comprising something
  3. any small intracellular body found within another (characteristic of certain diseases)
  4. the act of including

inclusion

An internal flaw within a stone. Often inclusions are small mineral crystals
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22290

inclusion

Materials that are locked inside a mineral as it is forming.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22291

inclusion

(from the article `Allende meteorite`) The Allende meteorite, which is classified as a carbonaceous chondrite, consists of large, irregularly shaped white inclusions and rounded chondrules ... Garnets commonly contain many inclusions—i.e., fragments of other rocks and minerals. Pinwheel garnet and snowball garnet are designations s...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/15

inclusion

(in-kloo´zhәn) the act of enclosing or the condition of being enclosed. anything that is enclosed; a cell inclusion. cell inclusion a usually lifeless, often temporary, constituent in the cytoplasm of a cell. fetal inclusion a partially ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

inclusion

(xenolith) A fragment of older rock caught up in an igneous rock.
Found on http://www.ge-at.iastate.edu/glossary-of-geologic-terms/

inclusion

[n] - the state of being included 2. [n] - the relation of comprising something 3. [n] - the act of including
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=inclusion

Inclusion

• (n.) The act of including, or the state of being included; limitation; restriction; as, the lines of inclusion of his policy. • (n.) A foreign substance, either liquid or solid, usually of minute size, inclosed in the mass of a mineral.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/inclusion/

inclusion

noun the act of including
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=inclusion

INCLUSION

( I1, I2, I3) With I1 the best of the three, followed by I2 and I3, these grades are assigned to diamonds where the inclusions can be seen easily with the naked eye.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary275.php

Inclusion

[education] Inclusion in education is an approach once thought only necessary for educating students with special educational needs. Now it is crucial that all teachers ensure inclusive practice for all students in their classroom and the wider school. Under the inclusion model, students with special needs spend most or all of their time wi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclusion_(education)

Inclusion

[logic] In logic and mathematics, inclusion is the concept that all the contents of one object are also contained within a second object. The modern symbol for inclusion first appears in Gergonne (1816), who defines it as one idea `containing` or being `contained` by another, using the backward letter `C` to express this. Peirce articulated...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclusion_(logic)

Inclusion

[mineral] In mineralogy, an inclusion is any material that is trapped inside a mineral during its formation. In gemology, an inclusion is a characteristic enclosed within a gemstone, or reaching its surface from the interior. According to Hutton`s law of inclusions, fragments included in a host rock are older than the host rock itself. ==Mi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclusion_(mineral)

Inclusion

[set theory] ==Rationale for fair use in In the Sign of Evil page== The image linked here is claimed to be used under fair use because: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclusion_(set_theory)

Inclusion

[taxonomy] In taxonomy, inclusion is the process whereby two species that were believed to be distinct are found in fact to be the same and are thus combined as one species. Which name is kept for this unified species is sometimes a cause of debate, but generally it is the earlier-named one, and the other species is said to be `included` wi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclusion_(taxonomy)

Inclusion

[value and practice] Inclusion is an organizational practice and goal stemming from the sociological notion of inclusiveness which is the political action and personal effort but at the same time the presence of inclusion practices in which different groups or individuals having different backgrounds like origin, age, race and ethnicity, re...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclusion_(value_and_practice)

Inclusion

In·clu'sion noun [ Latin inclusio : confer French inclusion . See Include .] 1. The act of including, or the state of being included; limitation; restriction; as, the lines of inclusion of his policy. Sir W. Temple. 2. (Min.) A foreign subst...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/33

inclusion

A fragment of older material, including minerals and rock, that has been enclosed within another rock.
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/I/inclusion.html

Inclusion

A non metallic slug of material which has become entangled in the metal during its manufacture. A severe problem in thin cross section metal bellows manufacture.
Found on http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com/Charts/Glossary-html/Glossary_I.html

Inclusion

A particle of foreign matter contained within a gemstone. It can take, for example, the form of an air bubble or a foreign object. Some inclusions decrease the value of a stone, but some, such as needles in rutilated quartz and 'spangles' in amber , are prized.
Found on http://www.braybrook.co.uk/jewellery-and-silver-wisdom/gems-of-information/

Inclusion

A rock fragment incorporated into a younger igneous rock.
Found on http://www.evcforum.net/WebPages/Glossary_Geology.html

inclusion

a rock or liquid that is enclosed in another foreign kind of rock or mineral
Found on http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/volcano/glossary.html

inclusion

A small particle of another mineral, liquid, gas or some foreign matter that is contained within a gemstone
Found on http://www.saffronart.com/sitepages/jewelry/glossary.aspx

Inclusion

A visible foreign substance (flaw), fracture, or void inside a diamond or gemstone. Inclusions can contain water which will cause the stone to fracture when heated.
Found on http://www.allaboutgemstones.com/glossary_gemology.html
No exact match found