Iambus

I·am'bus noun ; plural Latin Iambi , English Iambuses . [ Latin iambus , Greek ...; probably akin to ... to throw, assail (the iambus being first used in satiric poetry), and to Latin jacere to throw. Confer Jet a shooting forth.] (Pros.) A foot consi...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/1

Iambus

• (n.) A foot consisting of a short syllable followed by a long one, as in /mans, or of an unaccented syllable followed by an accented one, as invent; an iambic. See the Couplet under Iambic, n.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/iambus/

Iambus

In in prosody, an iambus is a foot of two syllables, a short and a long one or an unaccented syllable followed by an accented one. The iambic metre is the fundamental rhythm of many English verses. The verse of five iambic feet is a favourite metre, being the heroic verse of English, German, and Italian poetry.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AI.HTM

Iambus

Another term for an iamb. See above.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

iambus

poetic foot consisting of short then a long syllable
Found on http://phrontistery.info/i.html

Iambus

[genre] Iambus (sometimes confusingly referred to as iambic poetry) was a genre of ancient Greek poetry that included but was not restricted to the iambic meter and whose origins modern scholars have traced to the cults of Demeter and Dionysus. The genre featured insulting and obscene language and sometimes it is referred to as `blame poetr...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iambus_(genre)
No exact match found