hinge

Folding metal joint which allows doors and lids to open and shut; it can be decorative as well as functional. Before the 16thC, pin hinges were used on boarded and panelled furniture (see joining): a loose pin or barrel acts as a pivot which is pushed through corresponding holes in the two parts to be joined. The wire hinge, consisting of two inter …...

Hinge

Hinges are the joints on which doors, gates, etc, turn. During the Middle Ages, even at an early period, they were frequently made very conspicuous, and were ornamented with scrolls: several of the illuminations of Caedmon's metrical Paraphrase of Scripture History, which is considered to have been written about the year 1000, exhibits doors with o...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TH.HTM

hinge

[n] - a circumstance upon which subsequent events depend 2. [n] - a joint that holds two parts together so that one can swing relative to the other 3. [v] - attach with a hinge
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=hinge

Hinge

The mechanism to enable windows and doors to open & close
Found on http://www.caldwell.co.uk/glossary/glossary.htm

Hinge

A paper or muslin stub used to affix a print to its mat
Found on http://www.ifla.org/VII/s30/pub/mg1.htm#5

Hinge

A jointed or flexible device that allows the turning or pivoting of a part, such as a door or lid, on a stationary frame.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

Hinge

A more or less local situation on which due to the formation of tensile openings, the structure can rotate as if it were an articulation.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20934

Hinge

Hinge noun [ Middle English henge , heeng ; akin to Dutch heng , LG. henge , Prov. English hingle a small hinge; connected with hang , v., and Icelandic hengja to hang. See Hang .] 1. The hook with its eye, or the joint, on which a doo...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/46

Hinge

Hinge transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Hinged ; present participle & verbal noun Hinging .] 1. To attach by, or furnish with, hinges. 2. To bend. [ Obsolete] Shak.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/46

Hinge

Hinge intransitive verb To stand, depend, hang, or turn, as on a hinge; to depend chiefly for a result or decision or for force and validity; -- usually with on or upon ; as, the argument hinges on this point. I. Taylor
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/46

hinge

1. The hook with its eye, or the joint, on which a door, gate, lid, etc, turns or swings; a flexible piece, as a strip of leather, which serves as a joint to turn on. 'The gate self-opened wide, On golden hinges turning.' (Milton) ... 2. That on which anything turns or depends; a governing principle; a cardinal point or rule; as, this argument was ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

hinge

flexible joint noun a joint that holds two parts together so that one can swing relative to the other
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=hinge

hinge

verb attach with a hinge
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=hinge

Hinge

• (n.) That on which anything turns or depends; a governing principle; a cardinal point or rule; as, this argument was the hinge on which the question turned. • (v. t.) To bend. • (n.) The hook with its eye, or the joint, on which a door, gate, lid, etc., turns or swings; a flexible piece, as a strip of leather, which serves as a joi...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/hinge/

hinge

(from the article `metalwork`) ...of time, the need for protective barriers ended, there was greater freedom of work and a definite trend toward ornamentation. Throughout England, ... There were no new marked developments in ironwork during the 14th century. Smiths confined their efforts mostly to hinges. Until this period the vine ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/52

Hinge

[surname] Hinge is a surname. Notable people with the surname include: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinge_(surname)

Hinge

zone of maximum curvature of a fold.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_geology

Hinge

Flexible joint of metal, wood, or other material allowing two or more ajoining sections to bend at a point within a specific radius.
Found on http://www.artisansofthevalley.com/comm_gloss3.html

hinge

Folding metal joint which allows doors and lids to open and shut; it can be decorative as well as functional. Before the 16thC, pin hinges were used on boarded and panelled furniture (see joining): a loose pin or barrel acts as a pivot which is pushed through corresponding holes in the two parts to be joined. The wire hinge, consisting of two inter...
Found on http://www.antique-marks.com/antique-terms-h.html

Hinge

A hinge is a type of bearing that connects two solid objects, typically allowing only a limited angle of rotation between them. Two objects connected by an ideal hinge rotate relative to each other about a fixed axis of rotation. Hinges may be made of flexible material or of moving components. In biology, many joints function as hinges. ==Door typ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinge

hinge

An inside or outside joint of the binding of a book, where the spine meets the covers. It is usually made of cloth and provides additional strength at the flex point. See book anatomy section for illustration.
Found on http://www.alibris.com/glossary/glossary-books
No exact match found