FOG

Fibre Optic Gyro
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary262.php

Fog

Fog is a collection of liquid water droplets or ice crystals suspended in the air at or near the Earth`s surface. The term `fog` is typically distinguished from the more generic term `cloud` in that fog is low-lying, and the moisture in the fog is often generated locally (such as from a nearby body of water, like a lake or the ocean, or from ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fog

fog

(fog) a colloid system in which the dispersion medium is a gas and the dispersed particles are liquid. an artifact seen on a radiograph caused by unintentional exposure to reducing contrast.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

fog

[n] - an atmosphere in which visibility is reduced because of a cloud of some substance 2. [n] - droplets of water vapor suspended in the air near the ground
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=fog

Fog

• (n.) Dead or decaying grass remaining on land through the winter; -- called also foggage. • (v. i.) To show indistinctly or become indistinct, as the picture on a negative sometimes does in the process of development. • (n.) A state of mental confusion. • (v. t.) To envelop, as with fog; to befog; to overcast; to darken; to ob...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/fog/

fog

murk noun an atmosphere in which visibility is reduced because of a cloud of some substance
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=fog

Fog

[poem] Sandburg has described the genesis of the poem. At a time when he was carrying a book of Japanese `Hokus`, he went to interview a juvenile court judge, and he had cut through Grant Park and saw the fog over Chicago harbor. He had certainly seen many fogs before, but this time he had to wait forty minutes for the judge, and he only ha...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fog_(poem)

Fog

Fog (fŏg) noun [ Confer Scot. fog , fouge , moss, foggage rank grass, Late Latin fogagium , W. ffwg dry grass.] (Agriculture) (a) A second growth of grass; aftergrass. (b) Dead or decaying grass remaining on land through the winter; --...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/52

Fog

Fog intransitive verb [ Etymol. uncertain.] To practice in a small or mean way; to pettifog. [ Obsolete] « Where wouldst thou fog to get a fee?» Dryden.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/52

Fog

Fog noun [ Dan. snee fog snow falling thick, drift of snow, driving snow, confer Icelandic fok spray, snowdrift, fjūk snowstorm, fjūka to drift.] 1. Watery vapor condensed in the lower part of the atmosphere and disturbing its transparency. It differs fr...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/52

Fog

Fog transitive verb (Agriculture) To pasture cattle on the fog, or aftergrass, of; to eat off the fog from.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/52

fog

1. Watery vapor condensed in the lower part of the atmosphere and disturbing its transparency. It differs from cloud only in being near the ground, and from mist in not approaching so nearly to fine rain. See Cloud. ... 2. A state of mental confusion. Fog alarm, Fog bell, Fog horn, etc, a bell, horn, whistle or other contrivance that sounds an alar...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Fog

A cloud of water droplets suspended in the air that touches the ground giving a horizontal visibility of less than 200 metres.
Found on http://www.metcheck.com/OTHER/glossary.asp

Fog

A cloud, with its base on the surface, reducing visibility. If visibility is frequently reduced to 1/4 of a mile or less, the fog is termed dense fog.
Found on http://www.weca.org/nws-terms.html

Fog

A condition of bad visibility in the lower atmosphere caused by the presence of particles of condensed moisture, of smoke, or of a mixture of the two held in suspension in the air.
Found on http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/glossary/

Fog

A hydrometeor consisting of a visible aggregate of minute water droplets (or ice crystals), suspended in the atmosphere near the Earth's surface. According to international definition, fog reduces visibility below one kilometer. Fog differs from cloud only in that the base of fog is at the Earth's surface while clouds are above the surface. When co...
Found on http://nsidc.org/arcticmet/glossary/fog.html

fog

A mass of cool air filled with tiny droplets forming upwards from ground level.
Found on http://www.quick-facts.co.uk/weather/glossary.html

Fog

A reader?s state of inability to imagine clearly the setting or action the author is presenting
Found on https://www.sfwa.org/2009/06/being-a-glossary-of-terms-useful-in-critiquing

Fog

A visible aggregate of minute water droplets suspended in the atmosphere at or near the surface of t
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Science/Weather/

FOG

A visible aggregate of minute water droplets suspended in the atmosphere at or near the surface of the earth, reducing horizontal visibility to less than 5/8 statute miles. It is created when the temperature and the dew point of the air have become the same, or nearly the same, and sufficient condensation nuclei are present. It is reported as 'FG' ...
Found on http://www.weather.com/glossary/f.html

fog

a visible gathering of water droplets suspended in the air near the earth's surface.
Found on http://www.sercc.com/glossary

Fog

An overall density in the photographic image cause by unintentional exposure to light or unwanted chemical activity
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21048

Fog

An overall density in the photographic image cause by unintentional exposure to light or unwanted chemical activity.
Found on http://www.rodsmith.org.uk/photographic%20glossary/rods%20photographic%20gl

fog

cloud of small water droplets near ground level and sufficiently dense to reduce horizontal visibility to less than 1,000 m (3,281 feet). The word ... [7 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/41

fog

Cloud that collects at the surface of the Earth, composed of water vapour that has condensed on particles of dust in the atmosphere. Cloud and fog are both caused by the air temperature falling below dew point. The thickness of fog depends on the number of water particles it contains. Officially, fog...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0034956.html
No exact match found