elasticity

(e″las-tis´ĭ-te) the quality of being elastic.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

elasticity

(from the article `distribution theory`) ...can also be written (Q/Q)/(L/L), reflects the percentage increase in production resulting from the addition of 1 percent to the amount of labour ... ...changes in price and demand. Others used family-budget statistics broken down by income level to estimate relationships between income and ......
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/17

elasticity

[n] - the tendency of a body to return to its original shape after it has been stretched or compressed
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=elasticity

Elasticity

• (n.) The quality of being elastic; the inherent property in bodies by which they recover their former figure or dimensions, after the removal of external pressure or altering force; springiness; tendency to rebound; as, the elasticity of caoutchouc; the elasticity of the air. • (n.) Power of resistance to, or recovery from, depression o...
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elasticity

snap noun the tendency of a body to return to its original shape after it has been stretched or compressed; `the waistband had lost its snap`
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elasticity

(economics) In economics, the measure of response of one variable to changes in another. Such measures are used to test the effects of changes in prices and incomes on demand and supply. Price elasticity of demand measures the responsiveness of changes in quantity demanded to a change in price...
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elasticity

(physics) In physics, the ability of a solid to recover its shape once deforming forces are removed. An elastic material obeys Hooke's law, which states that its deformation is proportional to the applied stress up to a certain point, called the elastic limit; beyond this point additio...
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Elasticity

[cloud computing] ==Purpose== Elasticity aims at matching the amount of resources allocated to a service with the amount of resources it actually requires, avoiding over- or under-provisioning. Over-provisioning, i.e., allocating more resources than required, should be avoided as the service provider often has to pay for the resources that ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elasticity_(cloud_computing)

Elasticity

[data store] The elasticity of a data store relates to the flexibility of its data model and clustering capabilities. The greater the number of data model changes that can be tolerated, and the more easily the clustering can be managed, the more elastic the data store is considered to be. ==Types== ===Clustering elasticity=== Clustering ela...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elasticity_(data_store)

Elasticity

[economics] In economics, elasticity is the measurement of how responsive an economic variable is to a change in another. For example: An elastic variable (or elasticity value greater than 1) is one which responds more than proportionally to changes in other variables. In contrast, an inelastic variable (or elasticity value less than 1) is ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elasticity_(economics)

Elasticity

[mathematics] Longtime editor was recently blocked for a period of two days for policy violations (e.g. vandalism-only account, double-voting, etc) on these suspected sockpuppets. The page here and here provide a lot of evidence in support for this stance, but an editor doesn`t seem to agree with the block in the blocking review section and...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elasticity_(mathematics)

Elasticity

[physics] In physics, elasticity (from Greek ἐλαστός `ductible`) is the tendency of solid materials to return to their original shape after being deformed. Solid objects will deform when forces are applied on them. If the material is elastic, the object will return to its initial shape and size when these forces are removed. The phy...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elasticity_(physics)

Elasticity

E`las·tic'i·ty noun [ Confer French élasticité .] 1. The quality of being elastic; the inherent property in bodies by which they recover their former figure or dimensions, after the removal of external pressure or altering force; springiness; tendency to rebound; as, the elasticity
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/E/16

elasticity

1. The quality of being elastic; the inherent property in bodies by which they recover their former figure or dimensions, after the removal of external pressure or altering force; springiness; tendency to rebound; as, the elasticity of caoutchouc; the elasticity of the air. ... 2. Power of resistance to, or recovery from, depression or overwork. Co...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Elasticity

A material is elastic if it returns to its original shape after being deformed. The maximum load that a body can experience and still return to its original shape is known as the Elastic Limit.MetalsThe elastic limit is defined as the 0.2% offset yield strength. This represents the stress at which the stress-strain curve for uniaxial tensile loadin...
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Elasticity

A measure of responsiveness of one economic variable to another -- usually the responsiveness of quantity to price along a supply or demand curve -- comparing percentage changes (%D) or changes in logarithms (d ln). The arc elasticity of x with respect to y is e = %Dx/%Dy. The point elasticity is e = d lnx/d lny = (y/x)(dx/dy).
Found on http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alandear/glossary/e.html

elasticity

A measure of responsiveness. The responsiveness of behavior measured by variable Z to a change in environment variable Y is the change in Z observed in response to a change in Y. Specifically, this approximation is common: elasticity = (percentage change in Z) / (percentage change in Y) The smaller the percentage change in Y is practical, the bette...
Found on http://www.econterms.com/glossary.cgi?query=elasticity

elasticity

A rubber ball is badly deformed upon impact with the ground but always regains its original form The property of certain materials that enables them to return to their original size and shape after an applied stress has been removed. A solid rubber ball, for example, can be squeezed, stretched, b...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/E/elasticity.html

elasticity

ability of a deformed material body to return to its original shape and size when the forces causing the deformation are removed. A body with this ... [25 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/17

Elasticity

Ability of a material to return to its original shape when load causing deformation is removed.
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Elasticity

Ability to return to former position or length after being stretched, due in large part to soundness and crimp.
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Elasticity

Comes from 'elasticity of demand' to determine what effect in response a change in price or offer will create. Those markets that show little change are inelastic; those that vary greatly with price are highly elastic.
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Elasticity

Elasticity indicates how one variable responds to a change in another variable. The main types of elasticity are elasticity of demand (price, cross price, income, advertising), and the elasticity of supply (price). The value can be either elastic or inelastic. An elastic value implies that the there will be a significant change in the quantity due ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20140

Elasticity

Elasticity is the property in virtue of which bodies resist change of volume and change of shape, and recover their former figure or state after external pressure, tension, or distortion. The former is called elasticity of volume, the latter elasticity of shape. The name Compressibility is also used in connection with the elasticity of volume; and ...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GE.HTM

elasticity

elasticity The quality or condition of being elastic; that is, the quality of returning to an original size and shape after compression or stretching.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/4284/
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