discontinuity

(Learning Modules / Mathematics / Beam calculations) When a smooth curve has a sudden change in its slope or direction.

Discontinuity

[geotechnical engineering] A discontinuity in geotechnical engineering (in geotechnical literature often denoted by joint) is a plane or surface that marks a change in physical or chemical characteristics in a soil or rock mass. A discontinuity can be, for example, a bedding, schistosity, foliation, joint, cleavage, fracture, fissure, crack...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discontinuity_(geotechnical_engineering)

discontinuity

[n] - lack of connection of continuity
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=discontinuity

Discontinuity

An interruption of the typical structure of the weldment such as a lack homogeneity in the mechanical or metallurgical or physical characteristics of the material or weldment. A discontinuity is not necessarily a defect.
Found on http://www.bocindustrial.co.uk/bocindustrial/technical/glossary/d.html

Discontinuity

A break in sequence or continuity of anything.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/d/i/discontinuity/source.html

Discontinuity

A break or interruption in the normal structure of an object.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/591-Discontinuity

Discontinuity

Dis·con`ti·nu'i·ty noun Want of continuity or cohesion; disunion of parts. ' Discontinuity of surface.' Boyle.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/79

discontinuity

noun lack of connection or continuity
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=discontinuity

Discontinuity

• (n.) Want of continuity or cohesion; disunion of parts.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/discontinuity/

discontinuity

Any interruption in the normal physical structure or configuration of a part, such as cracks, laps, seams, inclusions, or porosity. A discontinuity may or may not affect the usefulness of the part
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21115

DISCONTINUITY

Comparatively large contrast in meteorological elements over a relatively small distance or period of time. In oceanography, it is the abrupt change or jump of a variable at a line or surface.
Found on http://www.weather.com/glossary/d.html

Discontinuity

A break or interruption in the normal structure of an object.
Found on http://www.amgas.com/gloss.htm

discontinuity

Also called a jump, a point at which a function is not continuous.
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/D/discontinuity.html

Discontinuity

[Postmodernism] For Michel Foucault (1926-84), discontinuity and continuity reflect the flow of history and the fact that some `things are no longer perceived, described, expressed, characterised, classified, and known in the same way` from one era to the next. (1994). == Explanation == In developing the theory of archaeology of knowledge, ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discontinuity_(Postmodernism)

Discontinuity

A sudden or rapid change in physical properties of rocks within the earth. Discontinuities are recognized by seismic data. See also Mohorovicic discontinuity.
Found on http://www.evcforum.net/WebPages/Glossary_Geology.html

Discontinuity

A surface separating rock layers of differing properties or compositions. (See seismic discontinuity
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22392

Discontinuity

Comparatively large contrast in meteorological elements over a relatively small distance or period o
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Science/Weather/

Discontinuity

[linguistics] In linguistics, a discontinuity occurs when a given word or phrase is separated from another word or phrase that it modifies in such a manner that a direct connection cannot be established between the two without incurring crossing lines in the tree structure. The terminology that is employed to denote discontinuities varies d...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discontinuity_(linguistics)
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