DADA

revolutionary art movement at its peak in the 1920s, whose collages, performances and public readings of nonesense poetry called all existing cultural values into question.

Dada

A western Europe artistic and literary movement (1916-23) that sought the discovery of authentic reality through the abolition of traditional culture and aesthetic forms. Dada (French: 'hobby-horse'), nihilistic movement in the arts that flourished primarily in Zürich, New York City, Berlin, Cologne, Paris, and Hannover, Ger. in the early 20th cen...
Found on http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/glo/

Dada

[n] - a nihilistic art movement (especially in painting) that flourished in Europe early in the 20th century
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=Dada

DADA

An early twentieth century art movement which emerged during the First World War. Rather than supporting a specific art style of its own Dada ridiculed traditional art forms and contemporary culture. Dada artists produced art works which were considered deliberately nonsensical.
Found on http://www.redraggallery.co.uk/art-glossary.html

Dada

Artistic and literary movement founded in 1915 in a spirit of rebellion and disillusionment during World War I and lasting until about 1922. Although the movement had a fairly short life and was...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Dada

The Dada movement began in Zurich, in neutral Switzerland, during the First World War. It can be seen as a reaction by artists to what they saw as the unprecedented horror and folly of the war. They felt it called into question every aspect, including its art, of the society capable of starting and then prolonging it. Their aim was to destroy tradi...
Found on http://www.tate.org.uk/collections/glossary/definition.jsp?entryId=81

dada

dadaism noun a nihilistic art movement (especially in painting) that flourished in Europe early in the 20th century; based on irrationality and negation of the accepted laws of beauty
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Dada

nihilistic movement in the arts that flourished primarily in Zürich, Switzerland; New York City; Berlin, Cologne, and Hannover, Germany; and Paris in ... [24 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/1

Dada

The dada is an artistic and literary movement founded in 1915 in Zurich.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AD.HTM

Dada

Artistic and literary movement founded in 1915 in a spirit of rebellion and disillusionment during World War I and lasting until about 1922. Although the movement had a fairly short life and was concentrated in only a few centres (New York being the only non-European one), Dada was highly influential, allowing for new and more modern art moveme...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0003499.html

Dada

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Found on http://www.latinart.com/glossary.cfm?sort=D

DADA

A movement that emerged during World War I in Europe that purported to be anti-everything, even anti-art. Dada poked fun at all the established traditions and tastes in art with works that were deliberately shocking, vulgar, and nonsensical.
Found on http://www.modernsculpture.com/glossary.htm

Dada

A movement in art and literature, founded in Switzerland in the early twentieth century, which ridiculed contemporary culture and conventional art. The Dadaists shared an antimilitaristic and antiaesthetic attitude, generated in part by the horrors of World War I and in part by a rejection of accepted canons of morality and taste. The anarchic spir...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21532

Dada

Dada ɑː or Dadaism was an art movement of the European avant-garde in the early 20th century. Many claim Dada began in Zurich, Switzerland in 1916, spreading to Berlin shortly thereafter but the height of New York Dada was the year before, in 1915. To quote Dona Budd`s The Language of Art Knowledge, Dada was born out of negative reaction to the....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dada

Dada

Anarchic art from Switzerland, its intent was to provoke
Found on http://quick-facts.co.uk/art/painting.html
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