compression

A method of reducing the size of files or programs so that they can be downloaded or distributed more easily.

compression

(Learning Modules / Mathematics / Bridges) Any force that acts in order to shorten, or push together the ends of, a structural element. When pushing your hands together, your arms will be under compression. The towers of a suspension bridge, and the piers of an arch bridge, are under compression.

Compression

Compression expresses the given picture will less data and compression rate alone does not give an indication of final picture quality. It is necessary to compress the data in order to store and transmit digital television data using an economical amount of bandwidth. Different rates of compression are used with different and practically, the more data used the better the image quality. Multiple generations of compressed images always result in image degradation. ...

compression

using an algorithm to decrease the number of bits of user data to be transmitted, thereby increasing the efficiency of a communications channel. A related algorithm will expand the data back to its original form when it is received. In data communications compression is usually lossless, the original data is restored exactly as sent. For analogue services like speech (see codec) and pictures (see pixels), compression with some loss is often acceptable and a mobile phone codec will exploit this to achieve very high compression factors. ...

compression

Type: Term Pronunciation: kom-presh′ŭn Definitions: 1. A squeezing together; the exertion of pressure on a body in such a way as to tend to increase its density; the decrease in a dimension of a body under the action of two external forces directed toward one another in the same straight line.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=19553

compression

Fossil formed when an organism is flattened (compressed) and a thin film of organic material from its body is left in the rock.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/glossary_2.html

Compression

A technique to reduce the size of a file in order to make it more manageable and quicker to download. Compressed files have to be extracted using a utility such as PKZip or WinZip. Such files usually have a .zip extension.
Found on http://www.mantex.co.uk/samples/glo-1.htm

Compression

To reduce in size, details ...
Found on http://www.cryer.co.uk/glossary/c/index.htm

Compression

A process that uses an algorithm to reduce data volume while preserving the original data content. Compression is used to reduce the time required to send and receive data over a network, and to enable the recording of more data onto a memory card or other storage medium.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20171

compression

[n] - the process or result of becoming smaller or pressed together 2. [n] - encoding information while reducing the bandwidth or bits required 3. [n] - applying pressure
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=compression

Compression

Means of reducing stored image file sizes. Commonly used in DIP systems where the bit-map image for an A4 page is typically reduced to around 40KByte, but also used for program and data files in order to increase disk capacity. Decompression is the process which restores files to their original state.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20462

Compression

(Digital cameras and photo printers) Data may be compressed to reduce storage (memory) space or transmission times (= reducing the amount of data). Well-known compression standards include JPEG and MPEG.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20472

compression

many image files, both still and movie, can be greatly reduced in size using compression. Lossless compression gets rid of redundancy but leaves the image pristine. Lossy compression reduces the size of images by throwing away information that the eye should not miss. Done badly, lossy compression can cause visible artefacts
Found on http://www.animationpost.co.uk/doping/glossary.htm

Compression

Compression in audio recording means to reduce the dynamic range of a signal
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20532

Compression

A force tending to compress or reduce something.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20539

Compression

The raw 'bit image' delivered by a scanner to a computer is extremely large and wasteful of storage and transmission capacity. Coding algorithms and systems have been devised to compress the image, e.g. by making use of the fact that most documents have many 'white' or single tone areas. Decompression must take place before viewing or printing - ad...
Found on http://www.isomatic.co.uk/WBGlossary.htm

Compression

Squashing or forcing an object onto itself – usually making it take up less space. Compression of the spine occurs when the bone of the vertebrae are pushed closer together during injury.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20560

compression

The main way that digital can offer more channels is by compressing the signal. A lame example, but say you have a row of pixels that are all blue... You can either say: a blue pixel, a blue pixel, a blue pixel, a blue pixel, a blue pixel (etc...635 times more!) which is wasteful (and how analogue works), or you can say: a blue pixel - repeat six h...
Found on http://www.heyrick.co.uk/ricksworld/digibox/glossary.html

Compression

A technique for reducing the quantity of data required to make up a digital image. Compression techniques can be non-destructive (‘lossless`) or destructive (‘lossy`), in which part of the data set is discarded permanently. Converting still images into JPEG format is one example of lossy compression.
Found on http://www.computerarts.co.uk/downloads/3d__and__animation/the_3d_world_glo

Compression

The act of pressing together. It can result in deformation (as in shortening a spring) and improvement in, or creation of, stability. Compression is used (1) to provide absolute stability of fracture fixation, where indicated, and (2) to protect the fixation implants and to improve their efficiency by reducing the dynamic stresses on them them. Un...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20605

Compression

Axial force tending to shorten the member.
Found on http://www.corusconstruction.com/en/design_guidance/the_blue_book/

Compression

Broadly in two forms - 'lossy' and 'losless'. JPEG is a lossy compression format; it discards information on a sliding scale of size v. quality. With size over quality the image pixelates. Each time it is compressed it throws away more data. Lossless compression - GIF (Graphics Image Interchange) for onscreen use using LZW (Lempel-Ziv-Welch), also ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20829

Compression

Compression: 1. The act of pressing together. As in a compression fracture, nerve compression, or spinal cord compression. 2. To shorten in time. In embryology, there may be compression of development with some stages even omitted.
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=39885

Compression

The process of reducing the size of a digital file, usually through software. This speeds processing, transmission time and reduces storage requirements.
Found on http://www.rodsmith.org.uk/photographic%20glossary/rods%20photographic%20gl

Compression

Many projectors are able to display higher resolutions than they actually have by skipping lines and columns. As this affects the picture quality, several manufacturers have developed special compression methods, which actually compress with only the slightest loss of information.
Found on http://www.medium.co.uk/public/sales/glossaryc.html
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