compression

A method of reducing the size of files or programs so that they can be downloaded or distributed more easily.

compression

  1. an increase in the density of something
  2. the process or result of becoming smaller or pressed together
  3. encoding information while reducing the bandwidth or bits required
  4. applying pressure

compression

(Learning Modules / Mathematics / Bridges) Any force that acts in order to shorten, or push together the ends of, a structural element. When pushing your hands together, your arms will be under compression. The towers of a suspension bridge, and the piers of an arch bridge, are under compression.

compression

Stress that reduces the volume or length of a rock, as that produced by the convergence of plate margins.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22291

Compression

- Reducing the size of a file for electronic storage. See also JPEG.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21026

Compression

- Squeezing a file (or an image) into a more efficient form to reduce the amount of storage space required.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21026

Compression

(Digital cameras and photo printers) Data may be compressed to reduce storage (memory) space or transmission times (= reducing the amount of data). Well-known compression standards include JPEG and MPEG.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20472

compression

(kәm-presh´әn) the act of pressing upon or together; the state of being pressed together. in embryology, the shortening or omission of certain developmental stages. the flattening of soft tissue to improve optical density in radiographic procedures such as mammography.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

compression

[n] - the process or result of becoming smaller or pressed together 2. [n] - encoding information while reducing the bandwidth or bits required 3. [n] - applying pressure
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=compression

Compression

• (n.) The act of compressing, or state of being compressed.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/compression/

compression

condensation noun the process or result of becoming smaller or pressed together; `the contraction of a gas on cooling`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=compression

compression

(physics) Region of a sound wave where the particles of the medium through which it is travelling have been pushed close together, initially by the vibrating object that is the source of the sound. Sound waves consist of alternate regions of compressions and rarefactions travelling away from t...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0099427.html

Compression

[astronomy] Compression, in astronomy is the deviation of a heavenly body from the spherical form, called also the ellipticity. It is numerically expressed by the ratio of the differences of the axes to the major axis of the spheroid. The compression or `flattening` of the earth is about 1/298, which means that the ratio of the equatorial t...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compression_(astronomy)

Compression

[geology] In geology the term compression refers to a set of stresses directed toward the center of a rock mass. Compressive strength refers to the maximum compressive stress that can be applied to a material before failure occurs. When the maximum compressive stress is in a horizontal orientation, thrust faulting can occur, resulting in th...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compression_(geology)

Compression

[physics] In mechanics, compression is the application of balanced inward (`pushing`) forces to different points on a material or structure, that is, forces with no net sum or torque directed so as to reduce its size in one or more directions. It is contrasted with tension or traction, the application of balanced outward (`pulling`) forces;...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compression_(physics)

Compression

Com·pres'sion noun [ Latin compressio : confer French compression .] The act of compressing, or state of being compressed. ' Compression of thought.' Johnson.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/124

Compression

1. An increase in density and pressure in a medium, such as air, caused intermittently by the passag
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Technology/Home_Audio/

Compression

1. The act of pressing together. As in a compression fracture , nerve compression , or spinal cord compression.
Found on http://www.emedicinehealth.com/allergy_insect_sting/glossary_em.htm

Compression

1. The resilience of a golf ball 2. The flattening of the golf ball when contacted by the club
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Entertainment/Golf/

Compression

A condition caused by the action of squeezing or shortening of a component.
Found on http://www.areforum.org/up/GeneralStructures/JOIST%20AND%20STRUCTURAL%20GLO

Compression

A Digital photograph creates an image file that is enormous. To enable image files to become smaller and more manageable cameras employ some form of compression such as JPEG. RAW and TIFF files have no compression and take up more space.
Found on http://www.all-things-photography.com/digital-dictionary.html

Compression

A force tending to compress or reduce something.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20539

Compression

A method of electronically reducing the number of bits required to store or transmit data within a s
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Technology/Television_%28TV%29/

compression

A pressing or squeezing together. In medicine, it can describe a structure, such as a tumor, that presses on another part of the body, such as a nerve. It can also describe the flattening of soft tissue, such as the breast, that occurs during a mammogram (x-ray of the breast).
Found on http://www.cancer.gov/dictionary?expand=C

Compression

A process that uses an algorithm to reduce data volume while preserving the original data content. Compression is used to reduce the time required to send and receive data over a network, and to enable the recording of more data onto a memory card or other storage medium.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20171
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