Caesium

Caesium or cesium{#tag:ref|Caesium is the spelling recommended by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). The American Chemical Society (ACS) has used the spelling cesium since 1921, following Webster`s New International Dictionary. The element was named after the Latin word cæsius, meaning `bluish gray`. Hence, an alter......
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caesium

Caesium

(caesium 137, caesium wires) A radioactive metal used to treat cancers of the cervix, uterus and vagina. Also used in the form of thin wires to treat other types of cancer.
Found on http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/utilities/glossary/index.htm?search=c

Caesium

• (n.) A rare alkaline metal found in mineral water; -- so called from the two characteristic blue lines in its spectrum. It was the first element discovered by spectrum analysis, and is the most strongly basic and electro-positive substance known. Symbol Cs. Atomic weight 132.6.
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Caesium

Caesium is a soft metal which is often liquid at room temperature due to its relatively low melting point (28.5°C). It is an extremely reactive metal, reacting violently in contact with water and being rapidly attacked in air. As with other alkaline group metals, caesium can be prepared by electrolysis of the fused halides but, in addition, it can...
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/c/a/caesium/source.html

Caesium

Caesium is an alkaline metal discovered by Robert Bunsen in 1860, by spectral analysis, in the mineral water of Durkheim. It also occurs in the mineral pollux. Caesium is a soft metal closely resembling potassium, and is characterized by a spectrum containing two bright blue lines, along with others in the red, yellow and green.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GC.HTM

caesium

Soft, silvery-white, ductile metallic element, atomic number 55, relative atomic mass 132.905. It is one of the alkali metals that form Group 1 of the periodic table of the elements. The alkali metals increase in reactivity down the group, and caesium, with only the short-lived radioactive francium below it, is the most reactive of them all...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0003301.html
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